UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Overnight changes in the slope of sleep slow waves during infancy


Fattinger, Sara; Jenni, Oskar G; Schmitt, Bernhard; Achermann, Peter; Huber, Reto (2014). Overnight changes in the slope of sleep slow waves during infancy. Sleep, 37(2):245-53.

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVES Slow wave activity (SWA, 0.5-4.5 Hz) is a well-established marker for sleep pressure in adults. Recent studies have shown that increasing sleep pressure is reflected by an increased synchronized firing pattern of cortical neurons, which can be measured by the slope of sleep slow waves. Thus we aimed at investigating whether the slope of sleep slow waves might provide an alternative marker to study the homeostatic regulation of sleep during early human development. DESIGN All-night sleep electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded longitudinally at 2, 4, 6, and 9 months after birth. SETTING Home recording. PATIENTS OR PARTICIPANTS 11 healthy full-term infants (5 male, 6 female). INTERVENTIONS None. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS The slope of sleep slow waves increased with age. At all ages the slope decreased from the first to the last hour of non rapid-eye-movement (NREM) sleep, even when controlling for amplitude differences (P < 0.002). The decrease of the slope was also present in the cycle-by-cycle time course across the night (P < 0.001) at the age of 6 months when the alternating pattern of low-delta activity (0.75-1.75 Hz) is most prominent. Moreover, we found distinct topographical differences exhibiting the steepest slope over the occipital cortex. CONCLUSIONS The results suggest an age-dependent increase in synchronization of cortical activity during infancy, which might be due to increasing synaptogenesis. Previous studies have shown that during early postnatal development synaptogenesis is most pronounced over the occipital cortex, which could explain why the steepest slope was found in the occipital derivation. Our results provide evidence that the homeostatic regulation of sleep develops early in human infants.

STUDY OBJECTIVES Slow wave activity (SWA, 0.5-4.5 Hz) is a well-established marker for sleep pressure in adults. Recent studies have shown that increasing sleep pressure is reflected by an increased synchronized firing pattern of cortical neurons, which can be measured by the slope of sleep slow waves. Thus we aimed at investigating whether the slope of sleep slow waves might provide an alternative marker to study the homeostatic regulation of sleep during early human development. DESIGN All-night sleep electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded longitudinally at 2, 4, 6, and 9 months after birth. SETTING Home recording. PATIENTS OR PARTICIPANTS 11 healthy full-term infants (5 male, 6 female). INTERVENTIONS None. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS The slope of sleep slow waves increased with age. At all ages the slope decreased from the first to the last hour of non rapid-eye-movement (NREM) sleep, even when controlling for amplitude differences (P < 0.002). The decrease of the slope was also present in the cycle-by-cycle time course across the night (P < 0.001) at the age of 6 months when the alternating pattern of low-delta activity (0.75-1.75 Hz) is most prominent. Moreover, we found distinct topographical differences exhibiting the steepest slope over the occipital cortex. CONCLUSIONS The results suggest an age-dependent increase in synchronization of cortical activity during infancy, which might be due to increasing synaptogenesis. Previous studies have shown that during early postnatal development synaptogenesis is most pronounced over the occipital cortex, which could explain why the steepest slope was found in the occipital derivation. Our results provide evidence that the homeostatic regulation of sleep develops early in human infants.

Citations

4 citations in Web of Science®
4 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 10 Sep 2014
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:February 2014
Deposited On:10 Sep 2014 13:02
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:21
Publisher:Associated Professional Sleep Societies
ISSN:0161-8105
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.5665/sleep.3390
PubMed ID:24497653
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-98559

Download

[img]
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 490kB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations