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Improvement in outcomes after implantation of a novel polyurethane meniscal scaffold for the treatment of medial meniscus deficiency


Schüttler, Karl F; Pöttgen, Steffen; Getgood, Alan; Rominger, Marga B; Fuchs-Winkelmann, Susanne; Roessler, Philip P; Ziring, Ewgeni; Efe, Turgay (2015). Improvement in outcomes after implantation of a novel polyurethane meniscal scaffold for the treatment of medial meniscus deficiency. Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, 23(7):1929-1935.

Abstract

PURPOSE: Meniscal injury resulting in segmental loss of meniscal tissue is a major risk factor for the development of osteoarthritis. Tissue engineering strategies have provided scaffolds for meniscal regeneration in order to establish a treatment option for patients with limited opportunities for meniscal reconstruction. The purpose of this study was to assess the clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results 2 years after implantation of a polyurethane scaffold for chronic segmental medial meniscus deficiency following partial medial meniscectomy.
METHODS: Eighteen patients were treated with arthroscopic implantation of an ActiFit(®) (Orteq Sports Medicine) polyurethane meniscal scaffold for meniscus deficiency of the medial meniscus. Patients were followed up at 6, 12, and 24 months. Clinical outcome was assessed using patient-reported outcome scores (KOOS, KSS, UCLA activity scale, VAS for pain). Radiological outcome was assessed using MRI at 6, 12, and 24 months by evaluating scaffold morphology, scaffold integration, and additional joint injury, as well as joint inflammation.
RESULTS: Eighteen patients with a median age of 32.5 years (range 17-49) were enrolled. Statistically significant improvements were present in all patients, but one at 2 years compared to baseline in all categories. Complete resorption of the scaffold occurred in one patient representing a failure to treatment. MRI showed abnormal signal intensity of the scaffold when compared to residual meniscal tissue but without synovitis or joint inflammation. Extrusion of the scaffold was present in four patients. No correlation between scaffold extrusion and clinical outcome was observed.
CONCLUSION: Arthroscopic implantation of a polyurethane meniscal scaffold in patients with chronic segmental medial meniscus deficiency is not only a safe procedure but leads to good clinical results at a 2-year follow-up. Scaffold extrusion did not appear to affect clinical outcome. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: IV.

PURPOSE: Meniscal injury resulting in segmental loss of meniscal tissue is a major risk factor for the development of osteoarthritis. Tissue engineering strategies have provided scaffolds for meniscal regeneration in order to establish a treatment option for patients with limited opportunities for meniscal reconstruction. The purpose of this study was to assess the clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results 2 years after implantation of a polyurethane scaffold for chronic segmental medial meniscus deficiency following partial medial meniscectomy.
METHODS: Eighteen patients were treated with arthroscopic implantation of an ActiFit(®) (Orteq Sports Medicine) polyurethane meniscal scaffold for meniscus deficiency of the medial meniscus. Patients were followed up at 6, 12, and 24 months. Clinical outcome was assessed using patient-reported outcome scores (KOOS, KSS, UCLA activity scale, VAS for pain). Radiological outcome was assessed using MRI at 6, 12, and 24 months by evaluating scaffold morphology, scaffold integration, and additional joint injury, as well as joint inflammation.
RESULTS: Eighteen patients with a median age of 32.5 years (range 17-49) were enrolled. Statistically significant improvements were present in all patients, but one at 2 years compared to baseline in all categories. Complete resorption of the scaffold occurred in one patient representing a failure to treatment. MRI showed abnormal signal intensity of the scaffold when compared to residual meniscal tissue but without synovitis or joint inflammation. Extrusion of the scaffold was present in four patients. No correlation between scaffold extrusion and clinical outcome was observed.
CONCLUSION: Arthroscopic implantation of a polyurethane meniscal scaffold in patients with chronic segmental medial meniscus deficiency is not only a safe procedure but leads to good clinical results at a 2-year follow-up. Scaffold extrusion did not appear to affect clinical outcome. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: IV.

Citations

6 citations in Web of Science®
3 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Date:2015
Deposited On:01 Oct 2014 14:32
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:23
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0942-2056
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00167-014-2977-6
PubMed ID:24711104

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