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Teaming up to innovate: The importance of a joint knowledge base


Schulze, Anja; Heyn, Gundula (2009). Teaming up to innovate: The importance of a joint knowledge base. Marketing Review St. Gallen, 26(2):12-16.

Abstract

Companies are increasingly discovering the potential of collaborating with others to create innovative products - often across industries - by combining their specializations in a unique way. A pre-condition for the success of these ventures is to build a common knowledge base, usually by duplicating selected parts of the partner’s knowledge. In this article, a case study and a quantitative study seek to elaborate on the unanswered question: Which building blocks constitute a common knowledge base?

Companies are increasingly discovering the potential of collaborating with others to create innovative products - often across industries - by combining their specializations in a unique way. A pre-condition for the success of these ventures is to build a common knowledge base, usually by duplicating selected parts of the partner’s knowledge. In this article, a case study and a quantitative study seek to elaborate on the unanswered question: Which building blocks constitute a common knowledge base?

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, not refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:03 Faculty of Economics > Department of Business Administration
Dewey Decimal Classification:330 Economics
Language:English
Date:April 2009
Deposited On:02 Oct 2014 13:15
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:24
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:1865-6544
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s11621-009-0026-5
Other Identification Number:merlin-id:10058

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