UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Zu den religiösen Aspekten tugendhafter Politik (tokusei) zum Schutz von Herrscher und Volk im frühen Mittelalter


Schley, Daniel (2014). Zu den religiösen Aspekten tugendhafter Politik (tokusei) zum Schutz von Herrscher und Volk im frühen Mittelalter. Asiatische Studien, 68(1):285-315.

Abstract

This article focuses on administrative efforts through acts of benevo-
lent or virtuous governance (tokusei) as means to secure divine protection
from the Buddhas and kami in early medieval Japan. This aspect of tokusei has
hitherto been neglected in this regard mainly because the term came to be associated
primarily with economical regulations, especially debt relief. This narrow
understanding originated most notably with the “Regulations of the Einin era”,
Einin no tokuseirei 永仁の徳政令, issued in 1297, and has continued through the
following centuries until the present day. However, tokusei – as will be argued –
was part of the symbolic politics and religious justification of power, especially
for the Tennō and his court in Kyōto, and later for the warrior governments and
Shōgun in Kamakura. These acts of virtuous rule, manifesting in several ways,
served along with religious rituals as emergency measures for divine protection
against natural disasters like earthquakes, floods, crop failure or even astronomical
phenomena such as comets. At the turn of the 12th century, tokusei
began to be used for general political reforms as well, and with the dual government
between Kyōto and Kamakura taking shape, the focus shifted to hardships
of the rural population. In this context benevolent measures taken for the people
came to be deeply connected with divine protection for the powerful.

This article focuses on administrative efforts through acts of benevo-
lent or virtuous governance (tokusei) as means to secure divine protection
from the Buddhas and kami in early medieval Japan. This aspect of tokusei has
hitherto been neglected in this regard mainly because the term came to be associated
primarily with economical regulations, especially debt relief. This narrow
understanding originated most notably with the “Regulations of the Einin era”,
Einin no tokuseirei 永仁の徳政令, issued in 1297, and has continued through the
following centuries until the present day. However, tokusei – as will be argued –
was part of the symbolic politics and religious justification of power, especially
for the Tennō and his court in Kyōto, and later for the warrior governments and
Shōgun in Kamakura. These acts of virtuous rule, manifesting in several ways,
served along with religious rituals as emergency measures for divine protection
against natural disasters like earthquakes, floods, crop failure or even astronomical
phenomena such as comets. At the turn of the 12th century, tokusei
began to be used for general political reforms as well, and with the dual government
between Kyōto and Kamakura taking shape, the focus shifted to hardships
of the rural population. In this context benevolent measures taken for the people
came to be deeply connected with divine protection for the powerful.

Altmetrics

Downloads

36 downloads since deposited on 03 Oct 2014
26 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:Journals > Asiatische Studien / Études Asiatiques > Archive > 68 (2014) > 1
Dewey Decimal Classification:Unspecified
Language:German
Date:2014
Deposited On:03 Oct 2014 12:05
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:24
Publisher:Schweizerische Asiengesellschaft; Verlag Peter Lang AG
ISSN:0004-4717
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1515
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-99237

Download

[img]
Preview
Filetype: PDF
Size: 474kB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations