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Tilman Nagels „,Authentizität‘ in der Leben-Mohammed-Forschung“. Eine Antwort


Schoeler, Gregor (2014). Tilman Nagels „,Authentizität‘ in der Leben-Mohammed-Forschung“. Eine Antwort. Asiatische Studien, 68(2):469-496.

Abstract

This contribution is a response to Tilman Nagel’s essay “‘Authentizität’
in der Leben-Mohammed-Forschung” [‘Authenticity’ in the research on the Life
of Mohammed] in which the author again presents the main theses argued in his
monograph Mohammed. Leben und Legende and responds to criticism. Whereas
his critics agree with Nagel that complete ‘authenticity’ is unattainable in principle,
yet an asymptotic approximation of Mohammed as a figure is indeed possible,
the way to attain such an approximation remains a matter of dispute. Contrary
to Nagel, the proponents of the so-called isnad-cum-matn analysis hold this
method, which offers the possibility to date ḥadīṯs (traditions) and reconstruct
texts in circulation in the 1st cent. H., for one of the most successful towards
achieving this goal. Another successful procedure of proven value is the evaluation
and appraisal of the corpus of traditions traced back to ʿUrwa b. az-Zubayr
(d. c. 712), one of the earliest and most important collectors of historical material
in Islam. Proponents of both of these procedures do not apply the term ‘authentic’,
as asserted by Nagel, in the sense of ‘what exactly happened’, but rather
use this term if the transmitters of a tradition are historical figures and when the
process of transmission is proven to have ensued as indicated in the chain of
transmission.

This contribution is a response to Tilman Nagel’s essay “‘Authentizität’
in der Leben-Mohammed-Forschung” [‘Authenticity’ in the research on the Life
of Mohammed] in which the author again presents the main theses argued in his
monograph Mohammed. Leben und Legende and responds to criticism. Whereas
his critics agree with Nagel that complete ‘authenticity’ is unattainable in principle,
yet an asymptotic approximation of Mohammed as a figure is indeed possible,
the way to attain such an approximation remains a matter of dispute. Contrary
to Nagel, the proponents of the so-called isnad-cum-matn analysis hold this
method, which offers the possibility to date ḥadīṯs (traditions) and reconstruct
texts in circulation in the 1st cent. H., for one of the most successful towards
achieving this goal. Another successful procedure of proven value is the evaluation
and appraisal of the corpus of traditions traced back to ʿUrwa b. az-Zubayr
(d. c. 712), one of the earliest and most important collectors of historical material
in Islam. Proponents of both of these procedures do not apply the term ‘authentic’,
as asserted by Nagel, in the sense of ‘what exactly happened’, but rather
use this term if the transmitters of a tradition are historical figures and when the
process of transmission is proven to have ensued as indicated in the chain of
transmission.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:Journals > Asiatische Studien / Études Asiatiques > Archive > 68 (2014) > 2
Dewey Decimal Classification:Unspecified
Language:German
Date:2014
Deposited On:03 Oct 2014 12:56
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:24
Publisher:Schweizerische Asiengesellschaft; Verlag Peter Lang AG
ISSN:0004-4717
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1515
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-99257

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