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Disambiguation of the Semantics of German Prepositions: a Case Study


Clematide, Simon; Klenner, Manfred; Furrer, Lenz (2013). Disambiguation of the Semantics of German Prepositions: a Case Study. In: Proceedings of NLPCS 2013: 10th International Workshop on Natural Language Processing and Cognitive Science, Marseille, France — Octobre 2013, Marseille, France, 15 October 2013 - 16 October 2013, 137-150.

Abstract

In this paper, we describe our experiments in preposition disambiguation based on a – compared to a previous study – revised annotation scheme and new features derived from a matrix factorization approach as used in the field of distributional semantics. We report on the annotation and Maximum Entropy modelling of the word senses of two German prepositions, mit (‘with’) and auf (‘on’). 500 occurrences of each preposition were sampled from a treebank and annotated with syntacto-semantic classes by three annotators. Our coarse-grained classification scheme is geared towards the needs of information extraction, it relies on linguistic tests and it strives to separate semantically regular and transparent meanings from idiosyncratic meanings (i.e. of collocational constructions). We discuss our annotation scheme and the achieved inter-annotator agreement, we present descriptive statistical material e.g. on class distributions, we describe the impact of the various features on syntacto-semantic and semantic classification and focus on the contribution of semantic classes stemming from distributional semantics.

In this paper, we describe our experiments in preposition disambiguation based on a – compared to a previous study – revised annotation scheme and new features derived from a matrix factorization approach as used in the field of distributional semantics. We report on the annotation and Maximum Entropy modelling of the word senses of two German prepositions, mit (‘with’) and auf (‘on’). 500 occurrences of each preposition were sampled from a treebank and annotated with syntacto-semantic classes by three annotators. Our coarse-grained classification scheme is geared towards the needs of information extraction, it relies on linguistic tests and it strives to separate semantically regular and transparent meanings from idiosyncratic meanings (i.e. of collocational constructions). We discuss our annotation scheme and the achieved inter-annotator agreement, we present descriptive statistical material e.g. on class distributions, we describe the impact of the various features on syntacto-semantic and semantic classification and focus on the contribution of semantic classes stemming from distributional semantics.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Paper), not refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Computational Linguistics
Dewey Decimal Classification:000 Computer science, knowledge & systems
410 Linguistics
Uncontrolled Keywords:WordSenseDisambiguation, Preposition, Distributional Semantics, German
Language:English
Event End Date:16 October 2013
Deposited On:16 Oct 2014 21:28
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:25
Publisher:s.n.
Related URLs:https://sites.google.com/site/nlpcs2013/ (Organisation)
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-99580

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