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Bone mineral density and expression of vitamin D receptor-dependent calcium uptake mechanisms in the proximal small intestine after bariatric surgery


Elias, E; Casselbrant, A; Werling, M; Abegg, K; Vincent, R P; Alaghband-Zadeh, J; Olbers, T; le Roux, C W; Fändriks, L; Wallenius, V (2014). Bone mineral density and expression of vitamin D receptor-dependent calcium uptake mechanisms in the proximal small intestine after bariatric surgery. The British Journal of Surgery, 101(12):1566-1575.

Abstract

BACKGROUND Roux-en-Y gastric bypass may lead to impaired calcium uptake. Therefore, operation-specific effects of gastric bypass and vertical banded gastroplasty on bone mineral density (BMD) were examined in a randomized clinical trial. Bone resorption markers and mechanisms of decreased calcium uptake after gastric bypass were investigated using blood and endoscopic samples from two additional patient cohorts. METHODS Total BMD and non-weight-bearing skull BMD were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry at baseline, and 1 and 6 years after gastric bypass or vertical banded gastroplasty in patients who were not receiving calcium supplements. Bone resorption markers in serum and calcium uptake mechanisms in jejunal mucosa biopsies were analysed after gastric bypass by proteomics including radioimmunoassay, gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. RESULTS One year after surgery, weight loss was similar after gastric bypass and vertical banded gastroplasty. There was a moderate decrease in skull BMD after gastric bypass, but not after vertical banded gastroplasty (P < 0•001). Between 1 and 6 years after gastric bypass, skull BMD and total BMD continued to decrease (P = 0•001). C-terminal telopeptide levels in serum had increased twofold by 18 months after gastric bypass. Proteomic analysis of the jejunal mucosa revealed decreased levels of heat-shock protein 90β, a co-activator of the vitamin D receptor, after gastric bypass. Despite increased vitamin D receptor levels, expression of the vitamin D receptor-regulated calcium transporter protein TRPV6 decreased. CONCLUSION BMD decreases independently of weight after gastric bypass. Bone loss might be attributed to impaired calcium absorption caused by decreased activation of vitamin D-dependent calcium absorption mechanisms mediated by heat-shock protein 90β and TRPV6.

BACKGROUND Roux-en-Y gastric bypass may lead to impaired calcium uptake. Therefore, operation-specific effects of gastric bypass and vertical banded gastroplasty on bone mineral density (BMD) were examined in a randomized clinical trial. Bone resorption markers and mechanisms of decreased calcium uptake after gastric bypass were investigated using blood and endoscopic samples from two additional patient cohorts. METHODS Total BMD and non-weight-bearing skull BMD were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry at baseline, and 1 and 6 years after gastric bypass or vertical banded gastroplasty in patients who were not receiving calcium supplements. Bone resorption markers in serum and calcium uptake mechanisms in jejunal mucosa biopsies were analysed after gastric bypass by proteomics including radioimmunoassay, gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. RESULTS One year after surgery, weight loss was similar after gastric bypass and vertical banded gastroplasty. There was a moderate decrease in skull BMD after gastric bypass, but not after vertical banded gastroplasty (P < 0•001). Between 1 and 6 years after gastric bypass, skull BMD and total BMD continued to decrease (P = 0•001). C-terminal telopeptide levels in serum had increased twofold by 18 months after gastric bypass. Proteomic analysis of the jejunal mucosa revealed decreased levels of heat-shock protein 90β, a co-activator of the vitamin D receptor, after gastric bypass. Despite increased vitamin D receptor levels, expression of the vitamin D receptor-regulated calcium transporter protein TRPV6 decreased. CONCLUSION BMD decreases independently of weight after gastric bypass. Bone loss might be attributed to impaired calcium absorption caused by decreased activation of vitamin D-dependent calcium absorption mechanisms mediated by heat-shock protein 90β and TRPV6.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Veterinary Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:23 Oct 2014 09:23
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:26
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0007-1323
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/bjs.9626
PubMed ID:25209438
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-99718

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