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Smoking behavior, intention to quit, and preferences toward cessation programs among gay men in Zurich, Switzerland


Schwappach, D L B (2008). Smoking behavior, intention to quit, and preferences toward cessation programs among gay men in Zurich, Switzerland. Nicotine & Tobacco Research, 10(12):1783-1787.

Abstract

International data show that the prevalence of smoking is high among gay males. The need for tailored smoking cessation support has been widely acknowledged, but little is known about gay men's preferences toward culturally-adopted interventions. We investigated preferences toward tailored group programs in a survey study among a sample of gay smokers living in the urban community of Zurich, Switzerland. Preferences were assessed using vignettes describing alternative services randomized over participants. Men that self-defined as gay or bisexual completed the survey (N = 379). Responders smoked on average 20 cigarettes per day (CI 18.9-21.5) and the mean nicotine dependence score was 4.6 (CI 4.3-4.9). Men strongly preferred group cessation programs for gay men over generic programs, and services provided by the local gay health care provider over those offered by the traditional course provider. The data suggest that offering tailored programs will increase participation in cessation services. Results emphasize the need for culturally-adopted cessation interventions that provide men strategies for participating in recreational activities as nonsmokers. Gay health care organizations serve as important door openers to communicate the serious health threats for gay men caused by smoking, and may play an important role in attracting men to cessation services.

Abstract

International data show that the prevalence of smoking is high among gay males. The need for tailored smoking cessation support has been widely acknowledged, but little is known about gay men's preferences toward culturally-adopted interventions. We investigated preferences toward tailored group programs in a survey study among a sample of gay smokers living in the urban community of Zurich, Switzerland. Preferences were assessed using vignettes describing alternative services randomized over participants. Men that self-defined as gay or bisexual completed the survey (N = 379). Responders smoked on average 20 cigarettes per day (CI 18.9-21.5) and the mean nicotine dependence score was 4.6 (CI 4.3-4.9). Men strongly preferred group cessation programs for gay men over generic programs, and services provided by the local gay health care provider over those offered by the traditional course provider. The data suggest that offering tailored programs will increase participation in cessation services. Results emphasize the need for culturally-adopted cessation interventions that provide men strategies for participating in recreational activities as nonsmokers. Gay health care organizations serve as important door openers to communicate the serious health threats for gay men caused by smoking, and may play an important role in attracting men to cessation services.

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10 citations in Web of Science®
14 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Swiss Research Institute for Public Health and Addiction
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:11 March 2008
Deposited On:16 Jan 2009 14:58
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:49
Publisher:Taylor & Francis
ISSN:1462-2203
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1080/14622200802443502
PubMed ID:19023829

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