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Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells improve vascular regeneration and reduce leukocyte-endothelium activation in critical ischemic murine skin in a dose-dependent manner


Schweizer, Riccardo; Kamat, Pranitha; Schweizer, Dennis; Dennler, Cyrill; Zhang, Shengye; Schnider, Jonas T; Salemi, Souzan; Giovanoli, Pietro; Eberli, Daniel; Enzmann, Volker; Erni, Dominique; Plock, Jan A (2014). Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells improve vascular regeneration and reduce leukocyte-endothelium activation in critical ischemic murine skin in a dose-dependent manner. Cytotherapy, 16(10):1465-1469.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AIMS
Stem cells participate in vascular regeneration following critical ischemia. However, their angiogenic and remodeling properties, as well as their role in ischemia-related endothelial leukocyte activation, need to be further elucidated. Herein, we investigated the effect of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) in a critically ischemic murine skin flap model.

METHODS
Groups received either 1 × 10(5), 5 × 10(5), or 1 × 10(6) BM-MSCs or cell-free conditioned medium (CM). Controls received sodium chloride. Intravital fluorescence microscopy was performed for morphological and quantitative assessment of micro-hemodynamic parameters over 12 days.

RESULTS
Tortuosity and diameter of conduit-arterioles were pronounced in the MSC groups (P < 0.01), whereas vasodilation was shifted to the end arteriolar level in the CM group (P < 0.01). These effects were accompanied by angiopoietin-2 expression. Functional capillary density and red blood cell velocity were enhanced in all treatment groups (P < 0.01). Although a significant reduction of rolling and sticking leukocytes was observed in the MSC groups with a reduction of diameter in postcapillary venules (P < 0.01), animals receiving CM exhibited a leukocyte-endothelium interaction similar to controls. This correlated with leukocyte common antigen expression in tissue sections (P < 0.01) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase expression from tissue samples. Cytokine analysis from BM-MSC culture medium revealed a 50% reduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin [IL]-1β, IL-6, IL-12, tumor necrosis factor-α, interferon-γ) and chemokines (keratinocyte chemoattractant, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor) under hypoxic conditions.

DISCUSSION
We demonstrated positive effects of BM-MSCs on vascular regeneration and modulation of endothelial leukocyte adhesion in critical ischemic skin. The improvements after MSC application were dose-dependent and superior to the use of CM alone.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AIMS
Stem cells participate in vascular regeneration following critical ischemia. However, their angiogenic and remodeling properties, as well as their role in ischemia-related endothelial leukocyte activation, need to be further elucidated. Herein, we investigated the effect of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) in a critically ischemic murine skin flap model.

METHODS
Groups received either 1 × 10(5), 5 × 10(5), or 1 × 10(6) BM-MSCs or cell-free conditioned medium (CM). Controls received sodium chloride. Intravital fluorescence microscopy was performed for morphological and quantitative assessment of micro-hemodynamic parameters over 12 days.

RESULTS
Tortuosity and diameter of conduit-arterioles were pronounced in the MSC groups (P < 0.01), whereas vasodilation was shifted to the end arteriolar level in the CM group (P < 0.01). These effects were accompanied by angiopoietin-2 expression. Functional capillary density and red blood cell velocity were enhanced in all treatment groups (P < 0.01). Although a significant reduction of rolling and sticking leukocytes was observed in the MSC groups with a reduction of diameter in postcapillary venules (P < 0.01), animals receiving CM exhibited a leukocyte-endothelium interaction similar to controls. This correlated with leukocyte common antigen expression in tissue sections (P < 0.01) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase expression from tissue samples. Cytokine analysis from BM-MSC culture medium revealed a 50% reduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin [IL]-1β, IL-6, IL-12, tumor necrosis factor-α, interferon-γ) and chemokines (keratinocyte chemoattractant, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor) under hypoxic conditions.

DISCUSSION
We demonstrated positive effects of BM-MSCs on vascular regeneration and modulation of endothelial leukocyte adhesion in critical ischemic skin. The improvements after MSC application were dose-dependent and superior to the use of CM alone.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Urological Clinic
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Reconstructive Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:24 June 2014
Deposited On:04 Nov 2014 08:32
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:27
Publisher:Informa Healthcare
ISSN:1465-3249
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcyt.2014.05.008
PubMed ID:24972742

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