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Extended follow-up after atrial repair for transposition of the great arteries: a younger age at surgery improves late survival. - Zurich Open Repository and Archive


Genoni, Michele; Vogt, Paul; von Segesser, Ludwig; Seifert, Burkhardt; Arbenz, Urs; Jenni, Rolf; Turina, Marko (1999). Extended follow-up after atrial repair for transposition of the great arteries: a younger age at surgery improves late survival. Journal of Cardiac Surgery, 14(4):246-251.

Abstract

BACKGROUND Surgical treatment for transposition of the great arteries (TGA) usually involves anatomic repair, although atrial repair is used in cases with special coronary artery patterns. METHODS Records of all 239 patients surviving at least 30 days after atrial correction of TGA between 1962 and 1987 at the University Hospital in Zurich were reviewed. The mean length of follow-up time was 13.7 years (median 14.9 years; range from 0.05 to 30.1 years). The average age at surgery was 45.7 months (range from 7 days to 24.4 years). One hundred twenty-one patients had a simple TGA, whereas the remaining 118 had a complex TGA. RESULTS The surviving patients were in NYHA class I at time of follow-up. The most common reasons for death were systemic right ventricular dysfunction and sudden rhythm disturbances. There was a major risk for late cardiac event in patients over 3 years old at operation (p = 0.02) and also in patients with complex TGA (p = 0.03). However, date of surgery, previous surgery, or the postoperative requirement for a pacemaker did not greatly affect late cardiac mortality. CONCLUSIONS Although the procedure of choice for TGA is the arterial switch operation, the promising findings of the current long-term study, which reports the longest follow-up to date, indicate that the atrial switch operation is a good alternative procedure for the rare cases where the use of arterial switch procedures is limited.

Abstract

BACKGROUND Surgical treatment for transposition of the great arteries (TGA) usually involves anatomic repair, although atrial repair is used in cases with special coronary artery patterns. METHODS Records of all 239 patients surviving at least 30 days after atrial correction of TGA between 1962 and 1987 at the University Hospital in Zurich were reviewed. The mean length of follow-up time was 13.7 years (median 14.9 years; range from 0.05 to 30.1 years). The average age at surgery was 45.7 months (range from 7 days to 24.4 years). One hundred twenty-one patients had a simple TGA, whereas the remaining 118 had a complex TGA. RESULTS The surviving patients were in NYHA class I at time of follow-up. The most common reasons for death were systemic right ventricular dysfunction and sudden rhythm disturbances. There was a major risk for late cardiac event in patients over 3 years old at operation (p = 0.02) and also in patients with complex TGA (p = 0.03). However, date of surgery, previous surgery, or the postoperative requirement for a pacemaker did not greatly affect late cardiac mortality. CONCLUSIONS Although the procedure of choice for TGA is the arterial switch operation, the promising findings of the current long-term study, which reports the longest follow-up to date, indicate that the atrial switch operation is a good alternative procedure for the rare cases where the use of arterial switch procedures is limited.

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3 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1999
Deposited On:04 Nov 2014 11:46
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:27
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0886-0440
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1540-8191.1999.tb00988.x
PubMed ID:10874608

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