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Efficacy of Coming Out Proud to reduce stigma's impact among people with mental illness: pilot randomised controlled trial.


Rüsch, Nicolas; Abbruzzese, Elvira; Hagedorn, Eva; Hartenhauer, Daniel; Kaufmann, Ilias; Curschellas, Jan; Ventling, Stephanie; Zuaboni, Gianfranco; Bridler, René; Olschewski, Manfred; Kawohl, Wolfram; Rössler, Wulf; Kleim, Birgit; Corrigan, Patrick W (2014). Efficacy of Coming Out Proud to reduce stigma's impact among people with mental illness: pilot randomised controlled trial. British Journal of Psychiatry, 204:391-407.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Facing frequent stigma and discrimination, many people with mental illness have to choose between secrecy and disclosure in different settings. Coming Out Proud (COP), a 3-week peer-led group intervention, offers support in this domain in order to reduce stigma's negative impact.

AIMS

To examine COP's efficacy to reduce negative stigma-related outcomes and to promote adaptive coping styles (Current Controlled Trials number: ISRCTN43516734).

METHOD

In a pilot randomised controlled trial, 100 participants with mental illness were assigned to COP or a treatment-as-usual control condition. Outcomes included self-stigma, empowerment, stigma stress, secrecy and perceived benefits of disclosure.

RESULTS

Intention-to-treat analyses found no effect of COP on self-stigma or empowerment, but positive effects on stigma stress, disclosure-related distress, secrecy and perceived benefits of disclosure. Some effects diminished during the 3-week follow-up period.

CONCLUSIONS

Coming Out Proud has immediate positive effects on disclosure- and stigma stress-related variables and may thus alleviate stigma's negative impact.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Facing frequent stigma and discrimination, many people with mental illness have to choose between secrecy and disclosure in different settings. Coming Out Proud (COP), a 3-week peer-led group intervention, offers support in this domain in order to reduce stigma's negative impact.

AIMS

To examine COP's efficacy to reduce negative stigma-related outcomes and to promote adaptive coping styles (Current Controlled Trials number: ISRCTN43516734).

METHOD

In a pilot randomised controlled trial, 100 participants with mental illness were assigned to COP or a treatment-as-usual control condition. Outcomes included self-stigma, empowerment, stigma stress, secrecy and perceived benefits of disclosure.

RESULTS

Intention-to-treat analyses found no effect of COP on self-stigma or empowerment, but positive effects on stigma stress, disclosure-related distress, secrecy and perceived benefits of disclosure. Some effects diminished during the 3-week follow-up period.

CONCLUSIONS

Coming Out Proud has immediate positive effects on disclosure- and stigma stress-related variables and may thus alleviate stigma's negative impact.

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34 citations in Web of Science®
41 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Psychiatry, Psychotherapy, and Psychosomatics
06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
610 Medicine & health
Date:May 2014
Deposited On:04 Nov 2014 09:52
Last Modified:21 Aug 2017 05:30
Publisher:Royal College of Psychiatrists
ISSN:0007-1250
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1192/bjp.bp.113.135772
PubMed ID:24434073

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