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Patients' cosmetic satisfaction, pain, and functional outcomes after supraorbital craniotomy through an eyebrow incision


Reisch, Robert; Marcus, Hani J; Hugelshofer, Michael; Koechlin, Nicolas Olmo; Stadie, Axel; Kockro, Ralf A (2014). Patients' cosmetic satisfaction, pain, and functional outcomes after supraorbital craniotomy through an eyebrow incision. Journal of Neurosurgery, 121(3):730-743.

Abstract

OBJECT: The supraorbital approach through an eyebrow incision offers the opportunity to access a wide variety of lesions of the anterior, middle, and even the posterior fossa. The minimally invasive keyhole craniotomy limits brain exploration and retraction and offers the potential for improved surgical outcomes and reduced approach-related complications. Patient satisfaction, however, has not yet been reported in the literature.
METHODS: From January 2002 through December 2011, the lead author (R.R.) used a supraorbital approach through an eyebrow incision for 418 patients with cerebral aneurysms, brain tumors or cystic lesions, and other miscellaneous pathological conditions. For 408 of these patients, a detailed retrospective case note review was conducted to extract data on surgical outcomes and complications, and 375 patients completed a follow-up patient satisfaction questionnaire.
RESULTS: During the early perioperative period, 8 patients died (overall mortality rate 2.0%). Among patients surveyed, the overall level of satisfaction was high. Patients rated pain from the scar and headache on a scale from 1 to 5 (1 = no pain, 5 = severe pain) as follows: pain was a score of 1 for 289 patients (77.0%), 2 for 46 (12.3%), 3 for 22 (5.9%), 4 for 12 (3.2%), and 5 for 6 (1.6%). Patients also rated cosmetic outcome on a scale from 1 to 5 (1 = very pleasant, 5 = very unpleasant) as follows: outcome was a score of 1 for 315 patients (84.0%), 2 for 33 (8.8%), 3 for 14 (3.7%), 4 for 10 (2.7%), and 5 for 3 (0.8%). Postoperative chewing difficulty was reported for 8 patients (8 [2.1%] temporary, 0 permanent); palsy of the frontal muscle for 21 patients (5.6%; 13 [3.5%] temporary, 8 [2.1%] permanent); frontal hypesthesia for 31 patients (8.3%; 18 [4.8%] temporary, 13 [3.4%] permanent); and hyposmia for 11 patients (2.9%; 3 [0.8%] temporary, 8 [2.1%] permanent).
CONCLUSIONS: The supraorbital approach to the anterior, middle, and posterior fossae through an eyebrow incision offers a favorable rate of approach-associated surgical complications and high patient satisfaction with cosmetic outcome.

Abstract

OBJECT: The supraorbital approach through an eyebrow incision offers the opportunity to access a wide variety of lesions of the anterior, middle, and even the posterior fossa. The minimally invasive keyhole craniotomy limits brain exploration and retraction and offers the potential for improved surgical outcomes and reduced approach-related complications. Patient satisfaction, however, has not yet been reported in the literature.
METHODS: From January 2002 through December 2011, the lead author (R.R.) used a supraorbital approach through an eyebrow incision for 418 patients with cerebral aneurysms, brain tumors or cystic lesions, and other miscellaneous pathological conditions. For 408 of these patients, a detailed retrospective case note review was conducted to extract data on surgical outcomes and complications, and 375 patients completed a follow-up patient satisfaction questionnaire.
RESULTS: During the early perioperative period, 8 patients died (overall mortality rate 2.0%). Among patients surveyed, the overall level of satisfaction was high. Patients rated pain from the scar and headache on a scale from 1 to 5 (1 = no pain, 5 = severe pain) as follows: pain was a score of 1 for 289 patients (77.0%), 2 for 46 (12.3%), 3 for 22 (5.9%), 4 for 12 (3.2%), and 5 for 6 (1.6%). Patients also rated cosmetic outcome on a scale from 1 to 5 (1 = very pleasant, 5 = very unpleasant) as follows: outcome was a score of 1 for 315 patients (84.0%), 2 for 33 (8.8%), 3 for 14 (3.7%), 4 for 10 (2.7%), and 5 for 3 (0.8%). Postoperative chewing difficulty was reported for 8 patients (8 [2.1%] temporary, 0 permanent); palsy of the frontal muscle for 21 patients (5.6%; 13 [3.5%] temporary, 8 [2.1%] permanent); frontal hypesthesia for 31 patients (8.3%; 18 [4.8%] temporary, 13 [3.4%] permanent); and hyposmia for 11 patients (2.9%; 3 [0.8%] temporary, 8 [2.1%] permanent).
CONCLUSIONS: The supraorbital approach to the anterior, middle, and posterior fossae through an eyebrow incision offers a favorable rate of approach-associated surgical complications and high patient satisfaction with cosmetic outcome.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurosurgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:September 2014
Deposited On:22 Feb 2015 21:03
Last Modified:28 Mar 2017 10:28
Publisher:American Association of Neurological Surgeons
ISSN:0022-3085
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3171/2014.4.JNS13787
PubMed ID:24878288

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