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Effects of shame induction in borderline personality disorder


Scheel, Corinna N; Schneid, Eva-Maria; Tuescher, Oliver; Lieb, Klaus; Tuschen-Caffier, Brunna; Jacob, Gitta A (2013). Effects of shame induction in borderline personality disorder. Cognitive Therapy and Research, 37(6):1160-1168.

Abstract

Shame is a powerful emotion with a strong link to borderline personality disorder. This study investigates shame levels in borderline personality disorder, compared to major depressive disorder and healthy women. A total of 25 women with borderline personality disorder, 25 women with major depression and 23 healthy women underwent a shame induction exercise. The self-reported intensity of shame, anger, anxiety, sadness, joy, annoyance, and boredom, was measured five times. Compared to participants with major depression and healthy women, patients with borderline personality disorder had higher baseline levels of shame, but there was no evidence of greater emotional intensity or a prolonged return to baseline after shame induction. They were the only group to express increased anger following the exercise. These findings strengthen the view of stronger emotional negativity in borderline personality disorder. The differences in the impact of shame on anger may contribute toward understanding emotion regulation difficulties in borderline personality disorder.

Abstract

Shame is a powerful emotion with a strong link to borderline personality disorder. This study investigates shame levels in borderline personality disorder, compared to major depressive disorder and healthy women. A total of 25 women with borderline personality disorder, 25 women with major depression and 23 healthy women underwent a shame induction exercise. The self-reported intensity of shame, anger, anxiety, sadness, joy, annoyance, and boredom, was measured five times. Compared to participants with major depression and healthy women, patients with borderline personality disorder had higher baseline levels of shame, but there was no evidence of greater emotional intensity or a prolonged return to baseline after shame induction. They were the only group to express increased anger following the exercise. These findings strengthen the view of stronger emotional negativity in borderline personality disorder. The differences in the impact of shame on anger may contribute toward understanding emotion regulation difficulties in borderline personality disorder.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:06 Nov 2014 12:49
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:28
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0147-5916
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s10608-013-9567-7

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