Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Revisiting the impact of REM sleep behavior disorder on motor progression in Parkinson's disease


Sommerauer, M; Valko, P O; Werth, E; Poryazova, R; Hauser, S; Baumann, C R (2014). Revisiting the impact of REM sleep behavior disorder on motor progression in Parkinson's disease. Parkinsonism & Related Disorders, 20(4):460-462.

Abstract

BACKGROUND Estimation of progression in Parkinson's disease (PD) is useful to guide clinical decisions and to enable patients to plan and manage their life with PD. Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) and REM sleep without atonia (RWA) are recognized as early harbingers of neurodegeneration and may precede motor symptoms by years. However, their impact on motor progression remains elusive. METHODS We retrospectively analyzed polysomnographic and clinical data of 59 PD patients, grouping them into patients with RBD (n = 15), RWA (n = 22) and those with normal muscle atonia (n = 22). We compared the three groups with regard to motor progression, defined as changes in Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) III values per year, and selected PD specific characteristics. RESULTS Motor disability at first visit and time interval between first and last visits were similar between groups. We observed a significantly faster motor progression in PD patients with RBD and RWA than in those with preserved REM sleep atonia. CONCLUSION Our findings suggest that impaired muscle atonia during REM sleep might represent a marker of faster motor progression in PD.

Abstract

BACKGROUND Estimation of progression in Parkinson's disease (PD) is useful to guide clinical decisions and to enable patients to plan and manage their life with PD. Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) and REM sleep without atonia (RWA) are recognized as early harbingers of neurodegeneration and may precede motor symptoms by years. However, their impact on motor progression remains elusive. METHODS We retrospectively analyzed polysomnographic and clinical data of 59 PD patients, grouping them into patients with RBD (n = 15), RWA (n = 22) and those with normal muscle atonia (n = 22). We compared the three groups with regard to motor progression, defined as changes in Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) III values per year, and selected PD specific characteristics. RESULTS Motor disability at first visit and time interval between first and last visits were similar between groups. We observed a significantly faster motor progression in PD patients with RBD and RWA than in those with preserved REM sleep atonia. CONCLUSION Our findings suggest that impaired muscle atonia during REM sleep might represent a marker of faster motor progression in PD.

Statistics

Citations

5 citations in Web of Science®
4 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

41 downloads since deposited on 07 Nov 2014
18 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Date:April 2014
Deposited On:07 Nov 2014 09:52
Last Modified:27 Apr 2017 21:43
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1353-8020
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.parkreldis.2014.01.005
PubMed ID:24477360

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Preview
Content: Accepted Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 93kB
View at publisher