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Predictors of hippocampal atrophy in critically ill patients


Lindlau, A; Widmann, C N; Putensen, C; Jessen, F; Semmler, A; Heneka, M T (2015). Predictors of hippocampal atrophy in critically ill patients. European Journal of Neurology, 22(2):410-415.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Hippocampal atrophy is presumably one morphological sign of critical illness encephalopathy; however, predictors have not yet been determined. METHODS The data for this report derived from patients treated at the intensive care units (ICUs) of the University Hospital in Bonn in the years 2004-2006. These patients underwent structural magnetic resonance imaging 6-24 months after discharge. Volumes (intracranial, whole brain, white matter, grey matter, cerebral spinal fluid, bilateral hippocampus) were compared with healthy controls. Pro-inflammatory parameters and ICU scoring systems were explored in conjunction with brain volumes. Cut-scores were defined to differentiate patients with high from those with low inflammatory response. RESULTS Hippocampal and white matter volume were reduced in critically ill patients compared with healthy controls. Procalcitonin showed a very strong correlation (r = -0.903, P = 0.01) and interleukin-6 a moderate correlation (r = -0.538, P = 0.031) with hippocampal volume, but not with other brain volumes. C-reactive protein was linked to grey matter volume. There was no correlation with systemic inflammatory response syndrome criteria (body temperature, heart rate, respiratory rate, white blood cell count) or for hippocampal or whole brain volume. Furthermore, parameters representing severity of disease (APACHE II score, SOFA score, duration of stay and duration of mechanical ventilation) were not associated with hippocampal or other brain volumes. CONCLUSIONS This analysis suggests that high levels of procalcitonin and interleukin-6 in the blood serum of critically ill patients are associated with a high likelihood of hippocampal atrophy irrespective of the severity of disease measured by ICU scoring systems and other inflammatory parameters.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Hippocampal atrophy is presumably one morphological sign of critical illness encephalopathy; however, predictors have not yet been determined. METHODS The data for this report derived from patients treated at the intensive care units (ICUs) of the University Hospital in Bonn in the years 2004-2006. These patients underwent structural magnetic resonance imaging 6-24 months after discharge. Volumes (intracranial, whole brain, white matter, grey matter, cerebral spinal fluid, bilateral hippocampus) were compared with healthy controls. Pro-inflammatory parameters and ICU scoring systems were explored in conjunction with brain volumes. Cut-scores were defined to differentiate patients with high from those with low inflammatory response. RESULTS Hippocampal and white matter volume were reduced in critically ill patients compared with healthy controls. Procalcitonin showed a very strong correlation (r = -0.903, P = 0.01) and interleukin-6 a moderate correlation (r = -0.538, P = 0.031) with hippocampal volume, but not with other brain volumes. C-reactive protein was linked to grey matter volume. There was no correlation with systemic inflammatory response syndrome criteria (body temperature, heart rate, respiratory rate, white blood cell count) or for hippocampal or whole brain volume. Furthermore, parameters representing severity of disease (APACHE II score, SOFA score, duration of stay and duration of mechanical ventilation) were not associated with hippocampal or other brain volumes. CONCLUSIONS This analysis suggests that high levels of procalcitonin and interleukin-6 in the blood serum of critically ill patients are associated with a high likelihood of hippocampal atrophy irrespective of the severity of disease measured by ICU scoring systems and other inflammatory parameters.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2015
Deposited On:21 Nov 2014 10:17
Last Modified:14 Feb 2018 08:41
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:1351-5101
OA Status:Green
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/ene.12443
PubMed ID:24724819

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