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The good and the bad of neuroinflammation in multiple sclerosis


Naegele, Matthias; Martin, Roland (2014). The good and the bad of neuroinflammation in multiple sclerosis. In: Goodin, Douglas. Handbook of Clinical Neurology. Elsevier: Elsevier, 59-87.

Abstract

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common inflammatory, demyelinating, neurodegenerative disorder of the central nervous system (CNS). It is widely considered a T-cell mediated autoimmune disease that develops in genetically susceptible individuals, possibly under the influence of certain environmental trigger factors. The invasion of autoreactive CD4+ T-cells into the CNS is thought to be a central step that initiates the disease. Several other cell types, including CD8+ T-cells, B-cells and phagocytes appear to be involved in causing inflammation and eventually neurodegeneration. But inflammation is not entirely deleterious in MS. Evidence has accumulated in the recent years that show the importance of regulatory immune mechanisms which restrain tissue damage and initiate regeneration. More insight into the beneficial aspects of neuroinflammation might allow us to develop new treatment strategies for this enigmatic disease.

Abstract

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common inflammatory, demyelinating, neurodegenerative disorder of the central nervous system (CNS). It is widely considered a T-cell mediated autoimmune disease that develops in genetically susceptible individuals, possibly under the influence of certain environmental trigger factors. The invasion of autoreactive CD4+ T-cells into the CNS is thought to be a central step that initiates the disease. Several other cell types, including CD8+ T-cells, B-cells and phagocytes appear to be involved in causing inflammation and eventually neurodegeneration. But inflammation is not entirely deleterious in MS. Evidence has accumulated in the recent years that show the importance of regulatory immune mechanisms which restrain tissue damage and initiate regeneration. More insight into the beneficial aspects of neuroinflammation might allow us to develop new treatment strategies for this enigmatic disease.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, not refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:20 March 2014
Deposited On:11 Nov 2014 13:52
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:29
Publisher:Elsevier
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-444-52001-2.00003-0
PubMed ID:24507513

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