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The resting microstate networks (RMN): cortical distributions, dynamics, and frequency specific information flow


Pascual-Marqui, R D; Lehmann, D; Faber, Pascal L; Milz, Patricia; Kochi, Kieko; Yoshimura, Masafumi; Nishida, Keiichiro; Isotani, Toshiaki; Kinoshita, Toshihiko (2014). The resting microstate networks (RMN): cortical distributions, dynamics, and frequency specific information flow. arXiv 1411.1949, University of Zurich.

Abstract

A brain microstate is characterized by a unique, fixed spatial distribution of electrically active neurons with time varying amplitude. It is hypothesized that a microstate implements a functional/physiological state of the brain during which specific neural computations are performed. Based on this hypothesis, brain electrical activity is modeled as a time sequence of non-overlapping microstates with variable, finite durations (Lehmann and Skrandies 1980, 1984; Lehmann et al 1987). In this study, EEG recordings from 109 participants during eyes closed resting condition are modeled with four microstates. In a first part, a new confirmatory statistics method is introduced for the determination of the cortical distributions of electric neuronal activity that generate each microstate. All microstates have common posterior cingulate generators, while three microstates additionally include activity in the left occipital/parietal, right occipital/parietal, and anterior cingulate cortices. This appears to be a fragmented version of the metabolically (PET/fMRI) computed default mode network (DMN), supporting the notion that these four regions activate sequentially at high time resolution, and that slow metabolic imaging corresponds to a low-pass filtered version. In the second part of this study, the microstate amplitude time series are used as the basis for estimating the strength, directionality, and spectral characteristics (i.e., which oscillations are preferentially transmitted) of the connections that are mediated by the microstate transitions. The results show that the posterior cingulate is an important hub, sending alpha and beta oscillatory information to all other microstate generator regions. Interestingly, beyond alpha, beta oscillations are essential in the maintenance of the brain during resting state.

Abstract

A brain microstate is characterized by a unique, fixed spatial distribution of electrically active neurons with time varying amplitude. It is hypothesized that a microstate implements a functional/physiological state of the brain during which specific neural computations are performed. Based on this hypothesis, brain electrical activity is modeled as a time sequence of non-overlapping microstates with variable, finite durations (Lehmann and Skrandies 1980, 1984; Lehmann et al 1987). In this study, EEG recordings from 109 participants during eyes closed resting condition are modeled with four microstates. In a first part, a new confirmatory statistics method is introduced for the determination of the cortical distributions of electric neuronal activity that generate each microstate. All microstates have common posterior cingulate generators, while three microstates additionally include activity in the left occipital/parietal, right occipital/parietal, and anterior cingulate cortices. This appears to be a fragmented version of the metabolically (PET/fMRI) computed default mode network (DMN), supporting the notion that these four regions activate sequentially at high time resolution, and that slow metabolic imaging corresponds to a low-pass filtered version. In the second part of this study, the microstate amplitude time series are used as the basis for estimating the strength, directionality, and spectral characteristics (i.e., which oscillations are preferentially transmitted) of the connections that are mediated by the microstate transitions. The results show that the posterior cingulate is an important hub, sending alpha and beta oscillatory information to all other microstate generator regions. Interestingly, beyond alpha, beta oscillations are essential in the maintenance of the brain during resting state.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Working Paper
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Psychiatry, Psychotherapy, and Psychosomatics
04 Faculty of Medicine > The KEY Institute for Brain-Mind Research
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:10 November 2014
Deposited On:11 Nov 2014 15:14
Last Modified:08 Dec 2017 08:03
Series Name:arXiv
Number of Pages:14
Free access at:Related URL. An embargo period may apply.
Related URLs:http://arxiv.org/abs/1411.1949

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