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Reinventing the Neural Crest: Direct Reprogramming Makes iNCCs


Varum, Sandra; Sommer, Lukas (2014). Reinventing the Neural Crest: Direct Reprogramming Makes iNCCs. Cell Stem Cell, 15(4):397-399.

Abstract

Aberrant neural crest (NC) development is at the origin of many congenital diseases. Given the limitations in human NC cell isolation and expansion, the development of new strategies for NC generation is crucial. In this issue of Cell Stem Cell, Kim et al. (2014) report the direct reprogramming of postnatal fibroblasts into multipotent NC cells.

Abstract

Aberrant neural crest (NC) development is at the origin of many congenital diseases. Given the limitations in human NC cell isolation and expansion, the development of new strategies for NC generation is crucial. In this issue of Cell Stem Cell, Kim et al. (2014) report the direct reprogramming of postnatal fibroblasts into multipotent NC cells.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Anatomy
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Date:2 October 2014
Deposited On:17 Nov 2014 17:46
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:30
Publisher:Cell Press (Elsevier)
ISSN:1875-9777
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.stem.2014.09.007
PubMed ID:25280213

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