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Religious Intent and the Art of Courteous Pleasantry: A Few Letters from Englishwomen to Heinrich Bullinger (1543-1562)


Giselbrecht, Rebecca A (2014). Religious Intent and the Art of Courteous Pleasantry: A Few Letters from Englishwomen to Heinrich Bullinger (1543-1562). In: Chappell, Julie; Kramer, Kaley A. Women during the English Reformations: Renegotiating Gender and Religious Identity. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 45-67.

Abstract

"Religious Intend and the Art of Courteous Pleasantry" explores the possibility of gender inclusive Reformations-narrative in light of the exchanges between Heinrich Bullinger and English women from the perspective of microhistory and the history of culture. Particularly the linguistic, historical, and theological content of the thirteen-letter correspondence between Heinrich Bullinger and Anna Hilles, Lady Jane Grey, Anne Hooper and Margaret Parkhurst is considered. Inserting the women's letters and Bullinger's replies into the larger Reformation context reveals English women of remarkable independence and dedication to the religious and political Reformation of England. The women's religious and political language signifies a collective identity of co-combatants in a missionary struggle to reform England influenced by Zurich.

Abstract

"Religious Intend and the Art of Courteous Pleasantry" explores the possibility of gender inclusive Reformations-narrative in light of the exchanges between Heinrich Bullinger and English women from the perspective of microhistory and the history of culture. Particularly the linguistic, historical, and theological content of the thirteen-letter correspondence between Heinrich Bullinger and Anna Hilles, Lady Jane Grey, Anne Hooper and Margaret Parkhurst is considered. Inserting the women's letters and Bullinger's replies into the larger Reformation context reveals English women of remarkable independence and dedication to the religious and political Reformation of England. The women's religious and political language signifies a collective identity of co-combatants in a missionary struggle to reform England influenced by Zurich.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:01 Faculty of Theology > Institute of Theology
Dewey Decimal Classification:230 Christianity & Christian theology
Language:English
Date:17 November 2014
Deposited On:20 Nov 2014 16:45
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:32
Publisher:Palgrave Macmillan
ISBN:978-1137474735

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