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Role of sevoflurane in organ protection during cardiac surgery in children: A randomized controlled trial


Bettex, Dominique A; Wanner, Patrick M; Bosshart, Marco; Balmer, Christian; Knirsch, Walter; Dave, Hitendu; Dillier, Claudia; Bürki, Christoph; Hug, Maja; Seifert, Burkhardt; Spahn, Donat R; Beck-Schimmer, Beatrice (2015). Role of sevoflurane in organ protection during cardiac surgery in children: A randomized controlled trial. Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, 20(2):157-165.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES The protective effects of volatile anaesthetics against ischaemia-reperfusion injury have been shown in vitro, but clinical studies have yielded variable results. We hypothesized that, in children, sevoflurane provides superior cardioprotection after cardiac surgery on cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) compared with totally intravenous anaesthesia (TIVA). METHODS In this randomized controlled, single-centre study, 60 children with cyanotic and acyanotic heart defects undergoing elective cardiac surgery under CPB (RACHS-1 1-3) were randomized to sevoflurane or TIVA (midazolam <6 months of age, propofol >6 months of age). The primary end-point was the postoperative peak cardiac troponin I/T (cTnI/T). Perioperative cardiac function (as determined by brain-type natriuretic peptide, echocardiography and postoperative vasopressor/inotrope requirements), short-term clinical outcomes (duration of intubation, intensive care unit and hospital length of stay), postoperative inflammatory profile, and pulmonary, renal and liver function were defined as secondary end-points. Analysis of variance was used for statistical analysis. RESULTS There was no statistically significant difference in postoperative peak troponin values or any of the secondary end-points. In the subgroup of acyanotic patients under 6 months, sevoflurane led to significantly lower postoperative troponin levels compared with midazolam [reduction of 54% (95% confidence interval 29-71%, P = 0.002)], without any differences in secondary outcome parameters. CONCLUSIONS Sevoflurane did not provide superior myocardial protection in our general paediatric cardiac surgical population. In children under 6 months, however, sevoflurane might be beneficial in comparison with midazolam. The conditioning effects of sevoflurane in specific paediatric subgroups need to be further investigated.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES The protective effects of volatile anaesthetics against ischaemia-reperfusion injury have been shown in vitro, but clinical studies have yielded variable results. We hypothesized that, in children, sevoflurane provides superior cardioprotection after cardiac surgery on cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) compared with totally intravenous anaesthesia (TIVA). METHODS In this randomized controlled, single-centre study, 60 children with cyanotic and acyanotic heart defects undergoing elective cardiac surgery under CPB (RACHS-1 1-3) were randomized to sevoflurane or TIVA (midazolam <6 months of age, propofol >6 months of age). The primary end-point was the postoperative peak cardiac troponin I/T (cTnI/T). Perioperative cardiac function (as determined by brain-type natriuretic peptide, echocardiography and postoperative vasopressor/inotrope requirements), short-term clinical outcomes (duration of intubation, intensive care unit and hospital length of stay), postoperative inflammatory profile, and pulmonary, renal and liver function were defined as secondary end-points. Analysis of variance was used for statistical analysis. RESULTS There was no statistically significant difference in postoperative peak troponin values or any of the secondary end-points. In the subgroup of acyanotic patients under 6 months, sevoflurane led to significantly lower postoperative troponin levels compared with midazolam [reduction of 54% (95% confidence interval 29-71%, P = 0.002)], without any differences in secondary outcome parameters. CONCLUSIONS Sevoflurane did not provide superior myocardial protection in our general paediatric cardiac surgical population. In children under 6 months, however, sevoflurane might be beneficial in comparison with midazolam. The conditioning effects of sevoflurane in specific paediatric subgroups need to be further investigated.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Anesthesiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2015
Deposited On:21 Nov 2014 15:07
Last Modified:08 Dec 2017 08:18
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:1569-9285
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/icvts/ivu381
PubMed ID:25404229

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