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The effects of cardiac output and pulmonary arterial hypertension on volumetric capnography derived-variables during normoxia and hypoxia


Mosing, Martina; Kutter, Annette P N; Iff, Samuel; Raszplewicz, Joanna; Mauch, Jacqueline; Bohm, Stephan H; Tusman, Gerardo (2015). The effects of cardiac output and pulmonary arterial hypertension on volumetric capnography derived-variables during normoxia and hypoxia. Journal of Clinical Monitoring and Computing, 29(1):187-196.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to test the effect of cardiac output (CO) and pulmonary artery hypertension (PHT) on volumetric capnography (VCap) derived-variables. Nine pigs were mechanically ventilated using fixed ventilatory settings. Two steps of PHT were induced by IV infusion of a thromboxane analogue: PHT25 [mean pulmonary arterial pressure (MPAP) of 25 mmHg] and PHT40 (MPAP of 40 mmHg). CO was increased by 50 % from baseline (COup) with an infusion of dobutamine ≥5 μg kg−1 min−1 and decreased by 40 % from baseline (COdown) infusing sodium nitroglycerine ≥30 μg kg−1 min−1 plus esmolol 500 μg kg−1 min−1. Another state of PHT and COdown was induced by severe hypoxemia (FiO2 0.07). Invasive hemodynamic data and VCap were recorded and compared before and after each step using a mixed random effects model. Compared to baseline, the normalized slope of phase III (SnIII) increased by 32 % in PHT25 and by 22 % in PHT40. SnIII decreased non-significantly by 4 % with COdown. A combination of PHT and COdown associated with severe hypoxemia increased SnIII by 28 % compared to baseline. The elimination of CO2 per breath decreased by 7 % in PHT40 and by 12 % in COdown but increased only slightly with COup. Dead space variables did not change significantly along the protocol. At constant ventilation and body metabolism, pulmonary artery hypertension and decreases in CO had the biggest effects on the SnIII of the volumetric capnogram and on the elimination of CO2.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to test the effect of cardiac output (CO) and pulmonary artery hypertension (PHT) on volumetric capnography (VCap) derived-variables. Nine pigs were mechanically ventilated using fixed ventilatory settings. Two steps of PHT were induced by IV infusion of a thromboxane analogue: PHT25 [mean pulmonary arterial pressure (MPAP) of 25 mmHg] and PHT40 (MPAP of 40 mmHg). CO was increased by 50 % from baseline (COup) with an infusion of dobutamine ≥5 μg kg−1 min−1 and decreased by 40 % from baseline (COdown) infusing sodium nitroglycerine ≥30 μg kg−1 min−1 plus esmolol 500 μg kg−1 min−1. Another state of PHT and COdown was induced by severe hypoxemia (FiO2 0.07). Invasive hemodynamic data and VCap were recorded and compared before and after each step using a mixed random effects model. Compared to baseline, the normalized slope of phase III (SnIII) increased by 32 % in PHT25 and by 22 % in PHT40. SnIII decreased non-significantly by 4 % with COdown. A combination of PHT and COdown associated with severe hypoxemia increased SnIII by 28 % compared to baseline. The elimination of CO2 per breath decreased by 7 % in PHT40 and by 12 % in COdown but increased only slightly with COup. Dead space variables did not change significantly along the protocol. At constant ventilation and body metabolism, pulmonary artery hypertension and decreases in CO had the biggest effects on the SnIII of the volumetric capnogram and on the elimination of CO2.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Equine Department
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:English
Date:2015
Deposited On:27 Nov 2014 13:27
Last Modified:08 Dec 2017 08:25
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:1387-1307
Additional Information:The final publication is available at link.springer.com
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s10877-014-9588-0
PubMed ID:24908108

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