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Physical activity and risk of bleeding in elderly patients taking anticoagulants


Frey, Pascal M; Méan, Marie; Limacher, Andreas; Jaeger, Kurt; Beer, Hans-Jürg; Frauchiger, Beat; Aschwanden, Markus; Rodondi, Nicolas; Righini, Marc; Egloff, Michael; Osterwalder, Joseph; Kucher, Nils; Angelillo-Scherrer, Anne; Husmann, Marc; Banyai, Martin; Matter, Christian M; Aujesky, Drahomir (2015). Physical activity and risk of bleeding in elderly patients taking anticoagulants. Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis, 13(2):197-205.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Although the possibility of bleeding during anticoagulant treatment may limit patients from taking part in physical activity, the association between physical activity and anticoagulation-related bleeding is uncertain.

OBJECTIVES

To determine whether physical activity is associated with bleeding in elderly patients taking anticoagulants.

PATIENTS/METHODS

In a prospective multicenter cohort study of 988 patients aged ≥65 years receiving anticoagulants for venous thromboembolism, we assessed patients' self-reported physical activity level. The primary outcome was the time to a first major bleeding, defined as fatal bleeding, symptomatic bleeding in a critical site, or bleeding causing a fall in hemoglobin or leading to transfusions. The secondary outcome was the time to a first clinically-relevant non-major bleeding. We examined the association between physical activity level and time to a first bleeding using competing risk regression, accounting for death as a competing event. We adjusted for known bleeding risk factors and anticoagulation as a time-varying covariate.

RESULTS

During a mean follow-up of 22 months, patients with a low, moderate, and high physical activity level had an incidence of major bleeding of 11.6, 6.3, and 3.1 events per 100 patient-years, and an incidence of clinically relevant non-major bleeding of 14.0, 10.3, and 7.7 events per 100 patient-years, respectively. A high physical activity level was significantly associated with a lower risk of major bleeding (adjusted sub-hazard ratio 0.40, 95%-CI 0.22-0.72). There was no association between physical activity and non-major bleeding.

CONCLUSIONS

A high level of physical activity is associated with a decreased risk of major bleeding in elderly patients receiving anticoagulant therapy. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Although the possibility of bleeding during anticoagulant treatment may limit patients from taking part in physical activity, the association between physical activity and anticoagulation-related bleeding is uncertain.

OBJECTIVES

To determine whether physical activity is associated with bleeding in elderly patients taking anticoagulants.

PATIENTS/METHODS

In a prospective multicenter cohort study of 988 patients aged ≥65 years receiving anticoagulants for venous thromboembolism, we assessed patients' self-reported physical activity level. The primary outcome was the time to a first major bleeding, defined as fatal bleeding, symptomatic bleeding in a critical site, or bleeding causing a fall in hemoglobin or leading to transfusions. The secondary outcome was the time to a first clinically-relevant non-major bleeding. We examined the association between physical activity level and time to a first bleeding using competing risk regression, accounting for death as a competing event. We adjusted for known bleeding risk factors and anticoagulation as a time-varying covariate.

RESULTS

During a mean follow-up of 22 months, patients with a low, moderate, and high physical activity level had an incidence of major bleeding of 11.6, 6.3, and 3.1 events per 100 patient-years, and an incidence of clinically relevant non-major bleeding of 14.0, 10.3, and 7.7 events per 100 patient-years, respectively. A high physical activity level was significantly associated with a lower risk of major bleeding (adjusted sub-hazard ratio 0.40, 95%-CI 0.22-0.72). There was no association between physical activity and non-major bleeding.

CONCLUSIONS

A high level of physical activity is associated with a decreased risk of major bleeding in elderly patients receiving anticoagulant therapy. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Angiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Date:18 November 2015
Deposited On:04 Mar 2015 11:45
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:33
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:1538-7933
Additional Information:This is the accepted version of the following article: Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis, 13(2):197-205, which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jth.12793.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/jth.12793
PubMed ID:25403550

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