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Effect of intranasal oxygen administration on blood gas variables and outcome in neonatal calves with respiratory distress syndrome: 20 cases (2004-2006)


Bleul, U; Bircher, B M; Kähn, W (2008). Effect of intranasal oxygen administration on blood gas variables and outcome in neonatal calves with respiratory distress syndrome: 20 cases (2004-2006). Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, 233(2):289-293.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect of intranasal oxygen administration on blood gas variables and outcome in neonatal calves with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). DESIGN: Retrospective case series. ANIMALS: 20 neonatal calves with RDS. PROCEDURES: Arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO(2)), arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide, and arterial oxygen saturation (SaO(2)) before and after intranasal administration of oxygen were analyzed. RESULTS: There were significant increases in PaO(2) and SaO(2) in the first 24 hours after oxygen administration was begun, with mean +/- SD PaO(2) increasing from 38.4+/-8.8 mm Hg to 58.7+/-17.8 mm Hg during the first 3 hours of treatment. Calves with PaO(2)>55 mm Hg within the first 12 hours after oxygen administration was begun had a significantly higher survival rate (9/10) than did calves that did not reach this threshold (4/10). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Results suggested that intranasal oxygen administration was a simple method of improving blood gas variables in neonatal calves with RDS and that PaO(2) could be used to predict outcome.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect of intranasal oxygen administration on blood gas variables and outcome in neonatal calves with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). DESIGN: Retrospective case series. ANIMALS: 20 neonatal calves with RDS. PROCEDURES: Arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO(2)), arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide, and arterial oxygen saturation (SaO(2)) before and after intranasal administration of oxygen were analyzed. RESULTS: There were significant increases in PaO(2) and SaO(2) in the first 24 hours after oxygen administration was begun, with mean +/- SD PaO(2) increasing from 38.4+/-8.8 mm Hg to 58.7+/-17.8 mm Hg during the first 3 hours of treatment. Calves with PaO(2)>55 mm Hg within the first 12 hours after oxygen administration was begun had a significantly higher survival rate (9/10) than did calves that did not reach this threshold (4/10). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Results suggested that intranasal oxygen administration was a simple method of improving blood gas variables in neonatal calves with RDS and that PaO(2) could be used to predict outcome.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Farm Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:English
Date:15 July 2008
Deposited On:16 Jan 2009 15:09
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:49
Publisher:Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
ISSN:0003-1488
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.2460/javma.233.2.289
PubMed ID:18627236

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