Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Three-dimensional defect evaluation of air polishing on extracted human roots


Sahrmann, Philipp; Ronay, Valerie; Schmidlin, Patrick R; Attin, Thomas; Paqué, Frank (2014). Three-dimensional defect evaluation of air polishing on extracted human roots. Journal of Periodontology, 85(8):1107-1114.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Root surfaces experience continuous abrasive instrumentation during lifelong periodontal maintenance. Periodontists need both effective and minimally abrasive debridement techniques. Air polishing devices might, therefore, constitute a good alternative to mechanical instrumentation. Because little is known of the three-dimensional shape and volume of the abrasion caused by different powders, it is the aim of the study to investigate the three-dimensional extent of these defects.
METHODS: Cementum-covered roots of 20 extracted human premolars were coated with resin caps, leaving four areas with identical diameter open for instrumentation using bicarbonate powder and glycine powder. Treatment times were 5 and 10 seconds in a first interval and 10 seconds in a second interval. Maximum settings were chosen for power and lavage. The teeth were scanned using microcomputed tomography initially and after every treatment interval. Differences in volume and defect depths were calculated by superimposition of the scans and tested for significance (Wilcoxon test, P <0.001).
RESULTS: Defect volumes (in mm(3)) presented in medians (interquartile ranges) for the bicarbonate powder after 5, 10, 15, and 20 seconds, respectively, were 0.16 (0.11), 0.28 (0.16), 0.32 (0.18), and 0.41 (0.28), and for glycine powder, 0.00 (0.02), 0.01 (0.05), 0.03 (0.11), and 0.06 (0.1). For each time period, abrasion caused by glycine was significantly lower (five- to 20-fold) compared to defects caused by bicarbonate.
CONCLUSIONS: In patients with exposed root surfaces, cleaning with bicarbonate powder cannot be recommended. Less abrasive glycine powder, however, demonstrated non-critical substance loss.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Root surfaces experience continuous abrasive instrumentation during lifelong periodontal maintenance. Periodontists need both effective and minimally abrasive debridement techniques. Air polishing devices might, therefore, constitute a good alternative to mechanical instrumentation. Because little is known of the three-dimensional shape and volume of the abrasion caused by different powders, it is the aim of the study to investigate the three-dimensional extent of these defects.
METHODS: Cementum-covered roots of 20 extracted human premolars were coated with resin caps, leaving four areas with identical diameter open for instrumentation using bicarbonate powder and glycine powder. Treatment times were 5 and 10 seconds in a first interval and 10 seconds in a second interval. Maximum settings were chosen for power and lavage. The teeth were scanned using microcomputed tomography initially and after every treatment interval. Differences in volume and defect depths were calculated by superimposition of the scans and tested for significance (Wilcoxon test, P <0.001).
RESULTS: Defect volumes (in mm(3)) presented in medians (interquartile ranges) for the bicarbonate powder after 5, 10, 15, and 20 seconds, respectively, were 0.16 (0.11), 0.28 (0.16), 0.32 (0.18), and 0.41 (0.28), and for glycine powder, 0.00 (0.02), 0.01 (0.05), 0.03 (0.11), and 0.06 (0.1). For each time period, abrasion caused by glycine was significantly lower (five- to 20-fold) compared to defects caused by bicarbonate.
CONCLUSIONS: In patients with exposed root surfaces, cleaning with bicarbonate powder cannot be recommended. Less abrasive glycine powder, however, demonstrated non-critical substance loss.

Statistics

Citations

7 citations in Web of Science®
9 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 11 Dec 2014
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Dental Medicine > Clinic for Preventive Dentistry, Periodontology and Cariology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:August 2014
Deposited On:11 Dec 2014 17:57
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:36
Publisher:American Academy of Periodontology
ISSN:0022-3492
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1902/jop.2014.130629
PubMed ID:24476548

Download