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Increasing physical exercise levels: age-specific benefits of planning


Scholz, Urte; Sniehotta, Falko F; Burkert, Silke; Schwarzer, Ralf (2007). Increasing physical exercise levels: age-specific benefits of planning. Journal of Aging and Health, 19(5):851-866.

Abstract

PURPOSE This study examines the differential age effects on physical exercise of two planning interventions, action planning (when, where, how) and coping planning (anticipating barriers, mental simulation of success scenarios), and examines the mediating mechanisms of the interventions. METHODS The study assigned the participants, 205 cardiac rehabilitation patients, to one of the intervention groups (action-planning only or combined-planning group) or to a control group. Baseline measurement and follow-up took place 2 months apart. RESULTS The interventions enhanced physical exercise independently of age. Pretreatment coping planning was higher in older (65-82 years) than in younger (38-54 years) or middle-aged (55-64 years) participants. At Time 2, older participants were the only ones without further increase in coping planning. Advancement in coping planning partially mediated the effect of the intervention. CONCLUSION Coping planning facilitates improvement of physical exercise. Implications of age differences in planning are discussed.

Abstract

PURPOSE This study examines the differential age effects on physical exercise of two planning interventions, action planning (when, where, how) and coping planning (anticipating barriers, mental simulation of success scenarios), and examines the mediating mechanisms of the interventions. METHODS The study assigned the participants, 205 cardiac rehabilitation patients, to one of the intervention groups (action-planning only or combined-planning group) or to a control group. Baseline measurement and follow-up took place 2 months apart. RESULTS The interventions enhanced physical exercise independently of age. Pretreatment coping planning was higher in older (65-82 years) than in younger (38-54 years) or middle-aged (55-64 years) participants. At Time 2, older participants were the only ones without further increase in coping planning. Advancement in coping planning partially mediated the effect of the intervention. CONCLUSION Coping planning facilitates improvement of physical exercise. Implications of age differences in planning are discussed.

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41 citations in Web of Science®
45 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:October 2007
Deposited On:11 Dec 2014 16:48
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:37
Publisher:Sage Publications Ltd.
ISSN:0898-2643
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1177/0898264307305207
PubMed ID:17827449

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