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Airway management in head and neck cancer patients undergoing microvascular free tissue transfer: delayed extubation as an alternative to routine tracheotomy


Meerwein, Christian; Pézier, Thomas F; Beck-Schimmer, Beatrice; Schmid, Stephan; Huber, Gerhard F (2014). Airway management in head and neck cancer patients undergoing microvascular free tissue transfer: delayed extubation as an alternative to routine tracheotomy. Swiss Medical Weekly, 144:w13941.

Abstract

QUESTIONS UNDER STUDY: The aim of this study was to evaluate two practices of airway management in patients undergoing head and neck cancer (HNC) resection and microvascular free tissue transfer (MFTT), and to assess the advantages and disadvantages of the two approaches.
METHODS: Patients undergoing a delayed extubation approach (NO-TRACH group) and patients undergoing primary tracheotomy (PRIM-TRACH group) were retrospectively evaluated in terms of perioperative and postoperative outcome measures.
RESULTS: Not performing routine tracheotomy was safe and no perioperative airway complications occurred. NO-TRACH patients were extubated after 1.1 ± 0.9 days (mean ± standard deviation) and secondary tracheotomy was necessary in three patients (13%). NO-TRACH patients revealed decreased duration of surgery (p <0.05) and showed trends to earlier resumption of oral feeding and decreased length of hospitalisation. Flap complication rates were similar in both groups, with an overall flap survival rate of 97.5% (n = 39/40).
CONCLUSIONS: With appropriate postoperative care, carefully selected patients undergoing major HNC resections with MFTT can be safely managed without routine tracheotomy.

Abstract

QUESTIONS UNDER STUDY: The aim of this study was to evaluate two practices of airway management in patients undergoing head and neck cancer (HNC) resection and microvascular free tissue transfer (MFTT), and to assess the advantages and disadvantages of the two approaches.
METHODS: Patients undergoing a delayed extubation approach (NO-TRACH group) and patients undergoing primary tracheotomy (PRIM-TRACH group) were retrospectively evaluated in terms of perioperative and postoperative outcome measures.
RESULTS: Not performing routine tracheotomy was safe and no perioperative airway complications occurred. NO-TRACH patients were extubated after 1.1 ± 0.9 days (mean ± standard deviation) and secondary tracheotomy was necessary in three patients (13%). NO-TRACH patients revealed decreased duration of surgery (p <0.05) and showed trends to earlier resumption of oral feeding and decreased length of hospitalisation. Flap complication rates were similar in both groups, with an overall flap survival rate of 97.5% (n = 39/40).
CONCLUSIONS: With appropriate postoperative care, carefully selected patients undergoing major HNC resections with MFTT can be safely managed without routine tracheotomy.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Anesthesiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:30 Dec 2014 09:35
Last Modified:27 Apr 2017 22:16
Publisher:EMH Swiss Medical Publishers
ISSN:0036-7672
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.4414/smw.2014.13941
PubMed ID:24610153

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