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Global climate policy and local energy politics: Is India hiding behind the poor?


Jaeger, Mark Daniel; Michaelowa, Katharina (2014). Global climate policy and local energy politics: Is India hiding behind the poor? CIS Working Papers 83, Center for Comparative and International Studies (CIS) University of Zurich and ETH Zurich.

Abstract

Along with the large middle income countries Brazil, China and South Africa, India has been put under increasing pressure to shoulder parts of the mitigation burden and commit to national emission reduction targets. India, however, refers to its limited capacity and wide-spread energy poverty. Is India hiding behind its poor? While others examined the distribution of emissions within the country to answer this question, we study domestic policy making at the examples of energy subsidies and access to clean energy. Evidence from a combination of interviews and secondary sources suggests that domestic policy making is not generally inconsistent with the pro-poor arguments advanced at the international level. Given their large number and the country’s democratic system, the poor do have some weight in Indian politics. However, inconsistencies can be identified within India’s international discourse that simultaneously tries to project an image of a strong emerging economy, and of a poor developing country in need of special treatment. We show that this branding strategy is problematic both for the progress of international climate negotiations and for India’s poor.

Abstract

Along with the large middle income countries Brazil, China and South Africa, India has been put under increasing pressure to shoulder parts of the mitigation burden and commit to national emission reduction targets. India, however, refers to its limited capacity and wide-spread energy poverty. Is India hiding behind its poor? While others examined the distribution of emissions within the country to answer this question, we study domestic policy making at the examples of energy subsidies and access to clean energy. Evidence from a combination of interviews and secondary sources suggests that domestic policy making is not generally inconsistent with the pro-poor arguments advanced at the international level. Given their large number and the country’s democratic system, the poor do have some weight in Indian politics. However, inconsistencies can be identified within India’s international discourse that simultaneously tries to project an image of a strong emerging economy, and of a poor developing country in need of special treatment. We show that this branding strategy is problematic both for the progress of international climate negotiations and for India’s poor.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Working Paper
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Political Science
08 University Research Priority Programs > Asia and Europe
Dewey Decimal Classification:320 Political science
Uncontrolled Keywords:International climate negotiations, Indian energy politics, energy subsidies, electrification, clean cooking
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:30 Dec 2014 18:37
Last Modified:15 Aug 2017 20:27
Series Name:CIS Working Papers
Number of Pages:16
Official URL:http://www.cis.ethz.ch/content/dam/ethz/special-interest/gess/cis/cis-dam/Research/Working_Papers/WP_2014/2014_WP83_Jaeger_Michaelowa.pdf
Related URLs:http://www.cis.ethz.ch/research/working-papers.html

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