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Mental perspective in multiple-event memory and foresight


Stocker, Kurt (2014). Mental perspective in multiple-event memory and foresight. Journal of Cognitive Science, 15(1):57-95.

Abstract

This article investigates mental perspective in mental time travel along a sequence of two or more events. First, perspective in mental time travel along a sequence of two events is examined by cognitive-linguistically investigating the temporal cognition underlying the use of the pluperfect (as one possible window into two-event memory) and the future perfect (as one possible window into two-event foresight). Secondly, perspective in mental time travel along a sequence of more than two events is investigated by applying and extending the previous two-event analysis to these more complex memory structures. For mental time travel along a sequence of two events the following novel distinctions are offered: perspectival mental time travel into “anteriority in the past” versus perspectival mental time travel into “anteriority in the future”; perspectival mental time travel along a mental time line where past/future and anteriority/posteriority form two separate temporal reference frames versus perspectival mental time travel along a mental time line where past/future and anteriority/posteriority conglomerate to a single nondispersible temporal reference frame; single temporal direct viewings versus dual simultaneous temporal direct viewings; and looking into the future from the present moment versus looking into the future from the past. For mental time travel along a sequence of more than two events the following novel distinctions are offered: the combination of one direct temporal viewing with serial prospective temporal viewings versus all serial temporal direct viewings and episodic versus semantic perspectival multiple-event memory and foresight. The memory account developed in this article also extends recent work in memory theory which suggests that certain memory structures/ processes are “scale-independent,” which means that it is proposed that certain memory structures/processes feature in both long-term and short-term memory. The main contribution of this article to scale-independent memory theory is the cognitive-linguistically derived argument that such a scale-independent memory system consists of two temporal perspective points (up to now only one temporal perspective point has been assumed). Implications for cognitive modeling and for human versus animal cognition are discussed.

Abstract

This article investigates mental perspective in mental time travel along a sequence of two or more events. First, perspective in mental time travel along a sequence of two events is examined by cognitive-linguistically investigating the temporal cognition underlying the use of the pluperfect (as one possible window into two-event memory) and the future perfect (as one possible window into two-event foresight). Secondly, perspective in mental time travel along a sequence of more than two events is investigated by applying and extending the previous two-event analysis to these more complex memory structures. For mental time travel along a sequence of two events the following novel distinctions are offered: perspectival mental time travel into “anteriority in the past” versus perspectival mental time travel into “anteriority in the future”; perspectival mental time travel along a mental time line where past/future and anteriority/posteriority form two separate temporal reference frames versus perspectival mental time travel along a mental time line where past/future and anteriority/posteriority conglomerate to a single nondispersible temporal reference frame; single temporal direct viewings versus dual simultaneous temporal direct viewings; and looking into the future from the present moment versus looking into the future from the past. For mental time travel along a sequence of more than two events the following novel distinctions are offered: the combination of one direct temporal viewing with serial prospective temporal viewings versus all serial temporal direct viewings and episodic versus semantic perspectival multiple-event memory and foresight. The memory account developed in this article also extends recent work in memory theory which suggests that certain memory structures/ processes are “scale-independent,” which means that it is proposed that certain memory structures/processes feature in both long-term and short-term memory. The main contribution of this article to scale-independent memory theory is the cognitive-linguistically derived argument that such a scale-independent memory system consists of two temporal perspective points (up to now only one temporal perspective point has been assumed). Implications for cognitive modeling and for human versus animal cognition are discussed.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:31 Dec 2014 09:49
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:40
Publisher:Institute for Cognitive Science
Free access at:Related URL. An embargo period may apply.
Related URLs:http://j-cs.org/issues/__vol015i1/3.html (Publisher)
http://j-cs.org/gnuboard/bbs/board.php?bo_table=__vol015i1&wr_id=2

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