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Interacting effects of receiving social control and social support during smoking cessation


Ochsner, Sibylle; Knoll, Nina; Stadler, Gertraud; Luszczynska, Aleksandra; Hornung, Rainer; Scholz, Urte (2015). Interacting effects of receiving social control and social support during smoking cessation. Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 49(1):141-146.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Social control and support have effects on smoking cessation, but are mostly examined separately.
PURPOSE: Interacting effects of social control and support are investigated, hypothesizing synergistic effects.
METHODS: In 99 smokers, received social control and emotional support (both smoking specific) were assessed 2 weeks before a quit date (T1); objectively verified abstinence and self-reported numbers of cigarettes smoked daily were assessed 6 weeks after baseline (T2).
RESULTS: For both outcomes, associations with control (T1) were moderated by support (T1), but beneficial synergistic effects (high control/high support) emerged for few participants only. Effects were mainly driven by constellations of low control/high support associated with more cigarettes smoked daily (T2) and low control/low support linked to higher likelihood of abstinence (T2).
CONCLUSIONS: Different constellations of levels of control and support may be beneficial for quitting smoking. Whereas synergies of high domain-specific control and support may be beneficial, they only rarely occur.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Social control and support have effects on smoking cessation, but are mostly examined separately.
PURPOSE: Interacting effects of social control and support are investigated, hypothesizing synergistic effects.
METHODS: In 99 smokers, received social control and emotional support (both smoking specific) were assessed 2 weeks before a quit date (T1); objectively verified abstinence and self-reported numbers of cigarettes smoked daily were assessed 6 weeks after baseline (T2).
RESULTS: For both outcomes, associations with control (T1) were moderated by support (T1), but beneficial synergistic effects (high control/high support) emerged for few participants only. Effects were mainly driven by constellations of low control/high support associated with more cigarettes smoked daily (T2) and low control/low support linked to higher likelihood of abstinence (T2).
CONCLUSIONS: Different constellations of levels of control and support may be beneficial for quitting smoking. Whereas synergies of high domain-specific control and support may be beneficial, they only rarely occur.

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Citations

5 citations in Web of Science®
2 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:German
Date:2015
Deposited On:31 Dec 2014 09:07
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:40
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0883-6612
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s12160-014-9635-6
PubMed ID:25212507

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