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Physical activity and the frequency of acute exacerbations in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease


Schönmann, M; Sievi, N A; Clarenbach, C F; Brack, T; Brutsche, M; Frey, M; Irani, S; Leuppi, J D; Ruediger, J; Senn, O; Thurnheer, R; Kohler, M (2015). Physical activity and the frequency of acute exacerbations in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Lung, 193(1):63-70.

Abstract

PURPOSE: Acute exacerbations (AE) in patients with COPD are associated with a decline in lung function, increased risk of hospitalization, and mortality. In this cross-sectional study we tested whether the level of objectively measured daily physical activity and exercise capacity are associated with the number of COPD exacerbations.
METHODS: In 210 patients with COPD (67 % men; mean (SD) age: 63 (8) years) enrolled in The Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Outcomes Cohort of Switzerland (TOPDOCS) physical activity (PA) (steps per day, physical activity level, (PAL)), exercise capacity (6-min walking distance, (6MWD)), comorbidities, lung function, and medication were assessed. Differences between COPD patients with frequent (≥2 year) and infrequent (0-1 year) exacerbations were assessed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to investigate whether the level of objectively measured daily physical activity and exercise capacity are associated with the number of COPD exacerbations.
RESULTS: Patients with frequent AE had a significantly lower FEV1 and 6MWD compared to patients with infrequent AE. In univariate analysis, the number of exacerbations was inversely associated with FEV1, 6MWD, BMI, and smoking status while there was a positive association with RV/TLC and combined inhaled medication. However, there was no significant association with PAL and steps per day. In multivariate analysis, FEV1 and the use of combined inhaled medication were independently associated with the number of AE, after correction for covariates.
CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this study imply that FEV1, independent of inhaled medication, is significantly associated with COPD exacerbations. Neither physical activity nor exercise capacity was independently associated with COPD exacerbations.

Abstract

PURPOSE: Acute exacerbations (AE) in patients with COPD are associated with a decline in lung function, increased risk of hospitalization, and mortality. In this cross-sectional study we tested whether the level of objectively measured daily physical activity and exercise capacity are associated with the number of COPD exacerbations.
METHODS: In 210 patients with COPD (67 % men; mean (SD) age: 63 (8) years) enrolled in The Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Outcomes Cohort of Switzerland (TOPDOCS) physical activity (PA) (steps per day, physical activity level, (PAL)), exercise capacity (6-min walking distance, (6MWD)), comorbidities, lung function, and medication were assessed. Differences between COPD patients with frequent (≥2 year) and infrequent (0-1 year) exacerbations were assessed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to investigate whether the level of objectively measured daily physical activity and exercise capacity are associated with the number of COPD exacerbations.
RESULTS: Patients with frequent AE had a significantly lower FEV1 and 6MWD compared to patients with infrequent AE. In univariate analysis, the number of exacerbations was inversely associated with FEV1, 6MWD, BMI, and smoking status while there was a positive association with RV/TLC and combined inhaled medication. However, there was no significant association with PAL and steps per day. In multivariate analysis, FEV1 and the use of combined inhaled medication were independently associated with the number of AE, after correction for covariates.
CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this study imply that FEV1, independent of inhaled medication, is significantly associated with COPD exacerbations. Neither physical activity nor exercise capacity was independently associated with COPD exacerbations.

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2 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Pneumology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of General Practice
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2015
Deposited On:30 Dec 2014 09:50
Last Modified:08 Dec 2017 09:37
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0341-2040
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00408-014-9673-7
PubMed ID:25503750

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