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Racial variation in sex steroid hormone concentration in black and white men: a meta-analysis


Richard, Aline; Rohrmann, Sabine; Zhang, Lei; Eichholzer, Monika; Basaria, Shehzad; Selvin, Elizabeth; Dobs, Adrian S; Kanarek, Norma; Menke, Andy; Nelson, William G; Platz, Elizabeth A (2014). Racial variation in sex steroid hormone concentration in black and white men: a meta-analysis. Andrology, 2(3):428-435.

Abstract

Sex steroid hormones are associated with chronic diseases and mortality with risk associations that differ between racial and ethnic groups. However, it is currently unclear whether sex steroid hormone levels differ between black and white men. The aim of this study was to assess racial variation in circulating testosterone, free testosterone, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) and estradiol levels in men. We searched PubMed for articles comparing circulating hormones in black and white men. A meta-analysis was performed using weighted mean differences (WMD) to compare hormones levels between black and white men. Fifteen eligible studies were identified; three did not report adjusted means. After age adjustment, free testosterone levels were significantly higher in black than in white men (WMD = 4.07 pg/mL, 95% CI 1.26, 6.88). Depending on the free testosterone concentration in white men, this WMD translates into a racial difference ranging from 2.5 to 4.9%. Total testosterone (WMD = 0.10 ng/mL, 95% CI -0.02, 0.22), estradiol (WMD = 0.67 pg/mL, 95% CI -0.04, 1.38) and SHBG (WMD = -0.45 nmol/L, 95% CI -1.75, 0.85) concentrations did not differ comparing blacks with whites. After adjustment for age, black men have a modestly but significantly 2.5 to 4.9% higher free testosterone level than white men. Based on previous studies on effects of sex steroid hormones on risk of chronic diseases or mortality, this modest difference is unlikely to explain racial differences in disease risk.

Abstract

Sex steroid hormones are associated with chronic diseases and mortality with risk associations that differ between racial and ethnic groups. However, it is currently unclear whether sex steroid hormone levels differ between black and white men. The aim of this study was to assess racial variation in circulating testosterone, free testosterone, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) and estradiol levels in men. We searched PubMed for articles comparing circulating hormones in black and white men. A meta-analysis was performed using weighted mean differences (WMD) to compare hormones levels between black and white men. Fifteen eligible studies were identified; three did not report adjusted means. After age adjustment, free testosterone levels were significantly higher in black than in white men (WMD = 4.07 pg/mL, 95% CI 1.26, 6.88). Depending on the free testosterone concentration in white men, this WMD translates into a racial difference ranging from 2.5 to 4.9%. Total testosterone (WMD = 0.10 ng/mL, 95% CI -0.02, 0.22), estradiol (WMD = 0.67 pg/mL, 95% CI -0.04, 1.38) and SHBG (WMD = -0.45 nmol/L, 95% CI -1.75, 0.85) concentrations did not differ comparing blacks with whites. After adjustment for age, black men have a modestly but significantly 2.5 to 4.9% higher free testosterone level than white men. Based on previous studies on effects of sex steroid hormones on risk of chronic diseases or mortality, this modest difference is unlikely to explain racial differences in disease risk.

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11 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:29 Dec 2014 12:33
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:42
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:2047-2919
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.2047-2927.2014.00206.x
PubMed ID:24648111

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