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Attitudes toward live and postmortem kidney donation: a survey of chinese medical students


Ge, Fangmin; Kaczmarczyk, Gabriele; Biller-Andorno, Nikola (2014). Attitudes toward live and postmortem kidney donation: a survey of chinese medical students. Experimental and Clinical Transplantation, 12(6):506-509.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: As the gap between supply and demand for donor organs is increasing, we sought to clarify the knowledge and attitudes regarding living-organ donation among Chinese medical students and analyze their incentives and influencing factors.
MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data were collected from Chinese medical students using a standardized questionnaire.
RESULTS: Of 320 surveyed participants, 261 participants (81.6%) said they would consider donating their live kidney organ, and 262 participants (81.9%) were willing to donate posthumously. Although 177 participants (55.7%) confirmed current regulations on posthumous organ donation, only 85 participants (26.7%) could correctly identify the regulations on live organ donation in China. Gender differences were not significantly associated with willingness to donate a kidney, whereas religion and socioeconomic status of the respondents were significantly associated with willingness to donate a live or posthumous kidney.
CONCLUSIONS: Among well-informed, young, healthy, and economically well-off Chinese male and female medical students, most were willing to be live kidney donors. Religion and socioeconomic status may affect the decision-making process for organ disposition.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: As the gap between supply and demand for donor organs is increasing, we sought to clarify the knowledge and attitudes regarding living-organ donation among Chinese medical students and analyze their incentives and influencing factors.
MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data were collected from Chinese medical students using a standardized questionnaire.
RESULTS: Of 320 surveyed participants, 261 participants (81.6%) said they would consider donating their live kidney organ, and 262 participants (81.9%) were willing to donate posthumously. Although 177 participants (55.7%) confirmed current regulations on posthumous organ donation, only 85 participants (26.7%) could correctly identify the regulations on live organ donation in China. Gender differences were not significantly associated with willingness to donate a kidney, whereas religion and socioeconomic status of the respondents were significantly associated with willingness to donate a live or posthumous kidney.
CONCLUSIONS: Among well-informed, young, healthy, and economically well-off Chinese male and female medical students, most were willing to be live kidney donors. Religion and socioeconomic status may affect the decision-making process for organ disposition.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Biomedical Ethics and History of Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:December 2014
Deposited On:16 Jan 2015 13:33
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:44
Publisher:Middle East Society for Organ Transplantation
ISSN:1304-0855
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.6002/ect.2014.0078
PubMed ID:25489801

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