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X-ray structure of a calcium-activated TMEM16 lipid scramblase


Brunner, Janine D; Lim, Novandy K; Schenck, Stephan; Duerst, Alessia; Dutzler, Raimund (2014). X-ray structure of a calcium-activated TMEM16 lipid scramblase. Nature, 516(7530):207-212.

Abstract

The TMEM16 family of proteins, also known as anoctamins, features a remarkable functional diversity. This family contains the long sought-after Ca(2+)-activated chloride channels as well as lipid scramblases and cation channels. Here we present the crystal structure of a TMEM16 family member from the fungus Nectria haematococca that operates as a Ca(2+)-activated lipid scramblase. Each subunit of the homodimeric protein contains ten transmembrane helices and a hydrophilic membrane-traversing cavity that is exposed to the lipid bilayer as a potential site of catalysis. This cavity harbours a conserved Ca(2+)-binding site located within the hydrophobic core of the membrane. Mutations of residues involved in Ca(2+) coordination affect both lipid scrambling in N. haematococca TMEM16 and ion conduction in the Cl(-) channel TMEM16A. The structure reveals the general architecture of the family and its mode of Ca(2+) activation. It also provides insight into potential scrambling mechanisms and serves as a framework to unravel the conduction of ions in certain TMEM16 proteins.

Abstract

The TMEM16 family of proteins, also known as anoctamins, features a remarkable functional diversity. This family contains the long sought-after Ca(2+)-activated chloride channels as well as lipid scramblases and cation channels. Here we present the crystal structure of a TMEM16 family member from the fungus Nectria haematococca that operates as a Ca(2+)-activated lipid scramblase. Each subunit of the homodimeric protein contains ten transmembrane helices and a hydrophilic membrane-traversing cavity that is exposed to the lipid bilayer as a potential site of catalysis. This cavity harbours a conserved Ca(2+)-binding site located within the hydrophobic core of the membrane. Mutations of residues involved in Ca(2+) coordination affect both lipid scrambling in N. haematococca TMEM16 and ion conduction in the Cl(-) channel TMEM16A. The structure reveals the general architecture of the family and its mode of Ca(2+) activation. It also provides insight into potential scrambling mechanisms and serves as a framework to unravel the conduction of ions in certain TMEM16 proteins.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Biochemistry
07 Faculty of Science > Department of Biochemistry
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:11 December 2014
Deposited On:22 Jan 2015 13:01
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:44
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:0028-0836
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1038/nature13984
PubMed ID:25383531

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