Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Union citizenship as demoi-cratic institution: increasing the EU's subjective legitimacy through supranational citizenship?


Welge, Rebecca (2015). Union citizenship as demoi-cratic institution: increasing the EU's subjective legitimacy through supranational citizenship? Journal of European Public Policy, 22(1):56-74.

Abstract

This study analyses the European Union's (EU's) citizenship regime as a demoi-cratic institution. It explores the effect of supranational citizenship on subjective legitimacy and focuses particularly on special access to the political system that is granted to moving EU citizens. The first section critically reviews the EU's citizenship regime as a model of gradual citizenship. Based on that, the second section examines the effects of EU citizenship status on subjective legitimacy, measured as political efficacy and satisfaction with democracy. It is argued that gradual political membership fosters political efficacy and satisfaction with democracy in national political systems. The empirical study examines perceptional differences at the most aggregate level and tests them against factors at the individual and contextual levels. The results provide evidence for the postulated effects on efficacy and point to the importance of domestic policies regulating access to the political system for the effects on efficacy and satisfaction with democracy.

Abstract

This study analyses the European Union's (EU's) citizenship regime as a demoi-cratic institution. It explores the effect of supranational citizenship on subjective legitimacy and focuses particularly on special access to the political system that is granted to moving EU citizens. The first section critically reviews the EU's citizenship regime as a model of gradual citizenship. Based on that, the second section examines the effects of EU citizenship status on subjective legitimacy, measured as political efficacy and satisfaction with democracy. It is argued that gradual political membership fosters political efficacy and satisfaction with democracy in national political systems. The empirical study examines perceptional differences at the most aggregate level and tests them against factors at the individual and contextual levels. The results provide evidence for the postulated effects on efficacy and point to the importance of domestic policies regulating access to the political system for the effects on efficacy and satisfaction with democracy.

Statistics

Citations

3 citations in Web of Science®
2 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Political Science
Dewey Decimal Classification:320 Political science
Uncontrolled Keywords:Citizenship, efficacy, European Union, membership, political rights, satisfaction with democracy
Language:English
Date:2015
Deposited On:04 Feb 2015 13:46
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:46
Publisher:Taylor & Francis
ISSN:1350-1763
Additional Information:Special Issue: Demoi-cracy in the European Union
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1080/13501763.2014.881300

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher