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Towards (re)constructing narratives from georeferenced photographs through visual analytics


Straumann, Ralph K; Coltekin, Arzu; Andrienko, Gennady (2014). Towards (re)constructing narratives from georeferenced photographs through visual analytics. Cartographic Journal, 51(2):152-165.

Abstract

We present a study that explores methodological steps towards (re)constructing collective narratives from the photo-taking behaviour of two groups (foreign tourists and inhabitants of Switzerland) by analysing spatial and temporal patterns in user-contributed, georeferenced photographs of Zurich, Switzerland. We reason that the photographers typically capture a scene or a moment because they want to remember or share it, thus these scenes or moments are meaningful to them. Various scholars suggest that the human experience (i.e. this meaningfulness) is what separates a
place from the mathematical descriptions of space. While this notion is well known in larger geographic literature, it is under-explored in cartographic research. We respond to this research gap and reconstruct static and dynamic patterns of photo-taking and -sharing behaviour to assist in capturing the implicit meaning in the studied locations. These locations
may be meaningful to only a certain group of people in certain moments; therefore, studying group differences in spatial and temporal photo-taking patterns will help building a collective and comparative story about the studied place. In our study, we focus on experiences of foreign versus domestic visitors, and in the process, we examine the potential (and feasibility) of georeferenced photographs for extracting such collective narratives using qualitative and quantitative visual analytical methods.

Abstract

We present a study that explores methodological steps towards (re)constructing collective narratives from the photo-taking behaviour of two groups (foreign tourists and inhabitants of Switzerland) by analysing spatial and temporal patterns in user-contributed, georeferenced photographs of Zurich, Switzerland. We reason that the photographers typically capture a scene or a moment because they want to remember or share it, thus these scenes or moments are meaningful to them. Various scholars suggest that the human experience (i.e. this meaningfulness) is what separates a
place from the mathematical descriptions of space. While this notion is well known in larger geographic literature, it is under-explored in cartographic research. We respond to this research gap and reconstruct static and dynamic patterns of photo-taking and -sharing behaviour to assist in capturing the implicit meaning in the studied locations. These locations
may be meaningful to only a certain group of people in certain moments; therefore, studying group differences in spatial and temporal photo-taking patterns will help building a collective and comparative story about the studied place. In our study, we focus on experiences of foreign versus domestic visitors, and in the process, we examine the potential (and feasibility) of georeferenced photographs for extracting such collective narratives using qualitative and quantitative visual analytical methods.

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6 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography
Dewey Decimal Classification:910 Geography & travel
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:05 Feb 2015 14:29
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:48
Publisher:Maney Publishing
ISSN:0008-7041
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1179/1743277414Y.0000000079

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