Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Changes in coagulation in standard laboratory tests and ROTEM in trauma patients between on-scene and arrival in the emergency department


Theusinger, Oliver M; Baulig, Werner; Seifert, Burkhardt; Müller, Stefan M; Mariotti, Sergio; Spahn, Donat R (2015). Changes in coagulation in standard laboratory tests and ROTEM in trauma patients between on-scene and arrival in the emergency department. Anesthesia and Analgesia, 120(3):627-635.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: When trauma patients arrive in the emergency department (ED), coagulopathy frequently is present. The time course, however, in which this coagulopathy develops is poorly understood. No study has fully evaluated the coagulation status, including thromboelastometry on-scene and at hospital arrival. We hypothesized that measured coagulation variables might change when measured at the scene of injury and upon arrival to the ED.
METHODS: We performed a prospective, single-center, observational study investigating coagulation status in 50 trauma patients on-scene and at arrival in the ED. Measurements included arterial blood gases, ROTEM®, protein S100, protein C activity, protein S, Quick value, international normalized ratio, activated partial thromboplastin time, D-dimer, coagulation factor V (FV), coagulation factor XIII (FXIII), fibrinogen, hemoglobin, hematocrit, platelets, and volume and blood products being administered during the first 24 hours.
RESULTS: Significant changes between on-scene and the ED were observed for the following values: partial venous oxygen pressure increased and sodium, glucose, and lactate decreased. For EXTEM, INTEM, and APTEM, clotting time and clot formation time increased significantly, whereas maximal clot firmness and angle α decreased significantly (all P ≤ 0.004). For FIBTEM, clotting time increased significantly and maximal clot firmness decreased significantly. In the laboratory, significant reductions in hemoglobin, hematocrit, platelets, activated partial thromboplastin time, fibrinogen, FV, FXIII, protein C activity, protein S, and protein S100 were observed (all P ≤ 0.001).
CONCLUSIONS: Although most all laboratory and rotational thromboelastometry coagulation tests worsened over time when measured on-scene and in the ED, monitoring coagulation at the scene of trauma does not provide clinically important information in a majority of trauma patients. One hour after injury, significant activation and consumption of fibrinogen, FV, FXIII, protein C activity, and protein S were observed.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: When trauma patients arrive in the emergency department (ED), coagulopathy frequently is present. The time course, however, in which this coagulopathy develops is poorly understood. No study has fully evaluated the coagulation status, including thromboelastometry on-scene and at hospital arrival. We hypothesized that measured coagulation variables might change when measured at the scene of injury and upon arrival to the ED.
METHODS: We performed a prospective, single-center, observational study investigating coagulation status in 50 trauma patients on-scene and at arrival in the ED. Measurements included arterial blood gases, ROTEM®, protein S100, protein C activity, protein S, Quick value, international normalized ratio, activated partial thromboplastin time, D-dimer, coagulation factor V (FV), coagulation factor XIII (FXIII), fibrinogen, hemoglobin, hematocrit, platelets, and volume and blood products being administered during the first 24 hours.
RESULTS: Significant changes between on-scene and the ED were observed for the following values: partial venous oxygen pressure increased and sodium, glucose, and lactate decreased. For EXTEM, INTEM, and APTEM, clotting time and clot formation time increased significantly, whereas maximal clot firmness and angle α decreased significantly (all P ≤ 0.004). For FIBTEM, clotting time increased significantly and maximal clot firmness decreased significantly. In the laboratory, significant reductions in hemoglobin, hematocrit, platelets, activated partial thromboplastin time, fibrinogen, FV, FXIII, protein C activity, protein S, and protein S100 were observed (all P ≤ 0.001).
CONCLUSIONS: Although most all laboratory and rotational thromboelastometry coagulation tests worsened over time when measured on-scene and in the ED, monitoring coagulation at the scene of trauma does not provide clinically important information in a majority of trauma patients. One hour after injury, significant activation and consumption of fibrinogen, FV, FXIII, protein C activity, and protein S were observed.

Statistics

Citations

11 citations in Web of Science®
13 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

70 downloads since deposited on 13 Jan 2015
26 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Anesthesiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2015
Deposited On:13 Jan 2015 16:46
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:48
Publisher:Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
ISSN:0003-2999
Additional Information:This is a non-final version of an article published in final form in (Theusinger, Oliver M; Baulig, Werner; Seifert, Burkhardt; Müller, Stefan M; Mariotti, Sergio; Spahn, Donat R (2014). Changes in coagulation in standard laboratory tests and ROTEM in trauma patients between on-scene and arrival in the emergency department. Anesthesia and Analgesia:Epub ahead of print.).
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1213/ANE.0000000000000561
PubMed ID:25545751

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Preview
Content: Accepted Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 504kB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations