Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

New therapeutic avenues for treatment of fibrosis: can we learn from other diseases?


Rogler, Gerhard (2014). New therapeutic avenues for treatment of fibrosis: can we learn from other diseases? Digestive Diseases, 32 Suppl:39-49.

Abstract

Crohn's disease (CD) is characterized by the frequent occurrence of complications, such as fibrotic strictures and subsequently the need for CD-related surgery. Chronic or recurrent inflammation is generally regarded to be a necessary precondition for the initiation of intestinal fibrosis. In this view, fibrosis is a pathologically augmented healing response to inflammation-induced mucosal tissue destruction and injury. At present, there are no approved or effective medical therapies aimed specifically at fibrosis or stricture in IBD. Indirect benefits may occur from anti-inflammatory therapies, although there is no consensus on this. Therapy for fibrosis is complicated by the fact that a wound-healing response is essential in CD and ulcerative colitis. Several pharmaceutical companies are now working on the therapy of fibrosis in other diseases. Strategies interfering with TGF-β expression and activation are promising. Pirfenidone has been studied in several clinical trials. Further therapeutic options are second-generation and wide-spectrum tyrosine kinase inhibitors. These inhibit growth factor receptor signaling, thus reducing fibrosis in animal models and some patients with tumor-associated fibrosis. At present, the development of antifibrotic therapies takes place in other diseases such as lung and liver fibrosis. This is partially due to a lack of experimental models for gut fibrosis and the fact that reliable readouts (MRI, serum markers) in patients are lacking. It will be important to test the above-mentioned newly available treatment strategies in IBD to profit from progress in other fibrotic diseases.

Abstract

Crohn's disease (CD) is characterized by the frequent occurrence of complications, such as fibrotic strictures and subsequently the need for CD-related surgery. Chronic or recurrent inflammation is generally regarded to be a necessary precondition for the initiation of intestinal fibrosis. In this view, fibrosis is a pathologically augmented healing response to inflammation-induced mucosal tissue destruction and injury. At present, there are no approved or effective medical therapies aimed specifically at fibrosis or stricture in IBD. Indirect benefits may occur from anti-inflammatory therapies, although there is no consensus on this. Therapy for fibrosis is complicated by the fact that a wound-healing response is essential in CD and ulcerative colitis. Several pharmaceutical companies are now working on the therapy of fibrosis in other diseases. Strategies interfering with TGF-β expression and activation are promising. Pirfenidone has been studied in several clinical trials. Further therapeutic options are second-generation and wide-spectrum tyrosine kinase inhibitors. These inhibit growth factor receptor signaling, thus reducing fibrosis in animal models and some patients with tumor-associated fibrosis. At present, the development of antifibrotic therapies takes place in other diseases such as lung and liver fibrosis. This is partially due to a lack of experimental models for gut fibrosis and the fact that reliable readouts (MRI, serum markers) in patients are lacking. It will be important to test the above-mentioned newly available treatment strategies in IBD to profit from progress in other fibrotic diseases.

Statistics

Citations

5 citations in Web of Science®
5 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

93 downloads since deposited on 05 Feb 2015
43 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:05 Feb 2015 14:36
Last Modified:03 Jun 2016 12:51
Publisher:Karger
ISSN:0257-2753
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1159/000367825
PubMed ID:25531352

Download

Download PDF  'New therapeutic avenues for treatment of fibrosis: can we learn from other diseases?'.
Preview
Content: Accepted Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 281kB
View at publisher
Download PDF  'New therapeutic avenues for treatment of fibrosis: can we learn from other diseases?'.
Preview
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 1MB