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Associations between age, motor function, and resting state sensorimotor network connectivity in healthy older adults


Seidler, Rachael; Erdeniz, Burak; Koppelmans, Vincent; Hirsiger, Sarah; Mérillat, Susan; Jäncke, Lutz (2015). Associations between age, motor function, and resting state sensorimotor network connectivity in healthy older adults. NeuroImage, 108:47-59.

Abstract

Aging is associated with impaired motor performance across a range of tasks. Both primary neural representations of movement and potential compensatory cognitive mechanisms appear to be disrupted in older age. Here we determined how age is associated with resting state sensorimotor functional connectivity, and whether connectivity strength is associated with motor performance. We investigated the association between age and resting state functional connectivity of several sensorimotor networks in 191 healthy older, right-handed individuals. Regions of interest were defined in the left motor cortex, left putamen, and right cerebellar lobules V and VIII. Analyses were adjusted for head motion, gray matter volume, diastolic blood pressure, and smoker status; we then evaluated whether connectivity is associated with participants' manual motor performance. We found both increased and decreased connectivity within portions of the motor cortical and cerebellar networks after adjusting for covariates. We observed that connectivity increased with age for the motor cortex and cerebellar lobule VIII with the putamen, providing evidence of greater interactivity across networks with age. Higher tapping frequency and greater grip force were associated with stronger connectivity between the motor cortex during resting state, putamen, cerebellar lobule VIII and the insular cortex, suggesting that greater network interactivity may protect against age declines in performance.

Abstract

Aging is associated with impaired motor performance across a range of tasks. Both primary neural representations of movement and potential compensatory cognitive mechanisms appear to be disrupted in older age. Here we determined how age is associated with resting state sensorimotor functional connectivity, and whether connectivity strength is associated with motor performance. We investigated the association between age and resting state functional connectivity of several sensorimotor networks in 191 healthy older, right-handed individuals. Regions of interest were defined in the left motor cortex, left putamen, and right cerebellar lobules V and VIII. Analyses were adjusted for head motion, gray matter volume, diastolic blood pressure, and smoker status; we then evaluated whether connectivity is associated with participants' manual motor performance. We found both increased and decreased connectivity within portions of the motor cortical and cerebellar networks after adjusting for covariates. We observed that connectivity increased with age for the motor cortex and cerebellar lobule VIII with the putamen, providing evidence of greater interactivity across networks with age. Higher tapping frequency and greater grip force were associated with stronger connectivity between the motor cortex during resting state, putamen, cerebellar lobule VIII and the insular cortex, suggesting that greater network interactivity may protect against age declines in performance.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
08 University Research Priority Programs > Dynamics of Healthy Aging
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:2015
Deposited On:12 Jan 2015 12:15
Last Modified:08 Dec 2017 10:18
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1053-8119
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2014.12.023
PubMed ID:25514517

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