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HDL in children with CKD promotes endothelial dysfunction and an abnormal vascular phenotype


Shroff, Rukshana; Speer, Thimoteus; Colin, Sophie; Charakida, Marietta; Zewinger, Stephen; Staels, Bart; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia; Hettrich, Inga; Rohrer, Lucia; O'Neill, Francis; McLoughlin, Eve; Long, David; Shanahan, Catherine M; Landmesser, Ulf; Fliser, Danilo; Deanfield, John E (2014). HDL in children with CKD promotes endothelial dysfunction and an abnormal vascular phenotype. Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (JASN), 25(11):2658-2668.

Abstract

Endothelial dysfunction begins in early CKD and contributes to cardiovascular mortality. HDL is considered antiatherogenic, but may have adverse vascular effects in cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and inflammatory conditions. The effect of renal failure on HDL properties is unknown. We studied the endothelial effects of HDL isolated from 82 children with CKD stages 2-5 (HDL(CKD)), who were free of underlying inflammatory diseases, diabetes, or active infections. Compared with HDL from healthy children, HDL(CKD) strongly inhibited nitric oxide production, promoted superoxide production, and increased vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression in human aortic endothelial cells, and reduced cholesterol efflux from macrophages. The effects on endothelial cells correlated with CKD grade, with the most profound changes induced by HDL from patients on dialysis, and partial recovery observed with HDL isolated after kidney transplantation. Furthermore, the in vitro effects on endothelial cells associated with increased aortic pulse wave velocity, carotid intima-media thickness, and circulating markers of endothelial dysfunction in patients. Symmetric dimethylarginine levels were increased in serum and fractions of HDL from children with CKD. In a longitudinal follow-up of eight children undergoing kidney transplantation, HDL-induced production of endothelial nitric oxide, superoxide, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 in vitro improved significantly at 3 months after transplantation, but did not reach normal levels. These results suggest that in children with CKD without concomitant disease affecting HDL function, HDL dysfunction begins in early CKD, progressing as renal function declines, and is partially reversed after kidney transplantation.

Abstract

Endothelial dysfunction begins in early CKD and contributes to cardiovascular mortality. HDL is considered antiatherogenic, but may have adverse vascular effects in cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and inflammatory conditions. The effect of renal failure on HDL properties is unknown. We studied the endothelial effects of HDL isolated from 82 children with CKD stages 2-5 (HDL(CKD)), who were free of underlying inflammatory diseases, diabetes, or active infections. Compared with HDL from healthy children, HDL(CKD) strongly inhibited nitric oxide production, promoted superoxide production, and increased vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression in human aortic endothelial cells, and reduced cholesterol efflux from macrophages. The effects on endothelial cells correlated with CKD grade, with the most profound changes induced by HDL from patients on dialysis, and partial recovery observed with HDL isolated after kidney transplantation. Furthermore, the in vitro effects on endothelial cells associated with increased aortic pulse wave velocity, carotid intima-media thickness, and circulating markers of endothelial dysfunction in patients. Symmetric dimethylarginine levels were increased in serum and fractions of HDL from children with CKD. In a longitudinal follow-up of eight children undergoing kidney transplantation, HDL-induced production of endothelial nitric oxide, superoxide, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 in vitro improved significantly at 3 months after transplantation, but did not reach normal levels. These results suggest that in children with CKD without concomitant disease affecting HDL function, HDL dysfunction begins in early CKD, progressing as renal function declines, and is partially reversed after kidney transplantation.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Clinical Chemistry
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
540 Chemistry
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:28 Jan 2015 12:36
Last Modified:08 Dec 2017 10:25
Publisher:American Society of Nephrology
ISSN:1046-6673
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1681/ASN.2013111212
PubMed ID:24854267

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