Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Modeling life satisfaction in spinal cord injury : the role of psychological resources


Peter, Claudio; Müller, Rachel; Cieza, Alarcos; Post, Marcel W M; van Leeuwen, Christel M C; Werner, Christina S; Geyh, Szilvia (2014). Modeling life satisfaction in spinal cord injury : the role of psychological resources. Quality of Life Research, 23(10):2693-2705.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The aims of the study were (1) to examine the associations between the psychological resources general self-efficacy (GSE) and purpose in life (PIL), appraisals, coping and life satisfaction, and (2) to examine whether the effects of the psychological resources on life satisfaction are mediated by appraisals and coping, as proposed by the spinal cord injury adjustment model (SCIAM).

METHODS:

Cross-sectional multicenter study conducted with persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) living in the community in Switzerland (N = 516). Pearson's correlations were calculated for aim 1, and structural equation modeling was conducted to address aim 2.

RESULTS:

GSE (r = .48) and PIL (r = .58) were positively related to life satisfaction. The initial model corresponding to the SCIAM yielded a poor model fit. The final model had a good model fit [χ (2) = 66.0, df = 21, p < .01, RMSEA = .065 (90 % confidence interval .048-.082), CFI = .97] explaining 57 % of variance of life satisfaction. PIL had a direct large effect on life satisfaction (β = .54). The influence of GSE on life satisfaction was mediated by loss appraisals. Avoidance, active and humor coping had small effects on life satisfaction.

CONCLUSIONS:

Psychological resources have a substantial effect on life satisfaction in persons with SCI. Our results correspond with the SCIAM and its conceptualization of adjustment as a multifactorial process, but did not fully support the hypothesized mediation. PIL was strongly related to higher life satisfaction and may be a suitable intervention target to support persons with SCI.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The aims of the study were (1) to examine the associations between the psychological resources general self-efficacy (GSE) and purpose in life (PIL), appraisals, coping and life satisfaction, and (2) to examine whether the effects of the psychological resources on life satisfaction are mediated by appraisals and coping, as proposed by the spinal cord injury adjustment model (SCIAM).

METHODS:

Cross-sectional multicenter study conducted with persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) living in the community in Switzerland (N = 516). Pearson's correlations were calculated for aim 1, and structural equation modeling was conducted to address aim 2.

RESULTS:

GSE (r = .48) and PIL (r = .58) were positively related to life satisfaction. The initial model corresponding to the SCIAM yielded a poor model fit. The final model had a good model fit [χ (2) = 66.0, df = 21, p < .01, RMSEA = .065 (90 % confidence interval .048-.082), CFI = .97] explaining 57 % of variance of life satisfaction. PIL had a direct large effect on life satisfaction (β = .54). The influence of GSE on life satisfaction was mediated by loss appraisals. Avoidance, active and humor coping had small effects on life satisfaction.

CONCLUSIONS:

Psychological resources have a substantial effect on life satisfaction in persons with SCI. Our results correspond with the SCIAM and its conceptualization of adjustment as a multifactorial process, but did not fully support the hypothesized mediation. PIL was strongly related to higher life satisfaction and may be a suitable intervention target to support persons with SCI.

Statistics

Citations

5 citations in Web of Science®
5 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:1 June 2014
Deposited On:14 Jan 2015 14:28
Last Modified:08 Dec 2017 10:27
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0962-9343
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s11136-014-0721-9
PubMed ID:24880699

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher