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Subtle to severe hepatobiliary morbidity in Opisthorchis viverrini endemic settings in southern Laos


Ayé Soukhathammavong, Phonepasong; Rajpho, Virasack; Phongluxa, Khampheng; Vonghachack, Youthanavanh; Hattendorf, Jan; Hongvanthong, Bouasy; Rasaphon, Oroth; Sripa, Banchob; Akkhavong, Kongsap; Hatz, Christoph; Odermatt, Peter (2015). Subtle to severe hepatobiliary morbidity in Opisthorchis viverrini endemic settings in southern Laos. Acta Tropica, 141:303-309.

Abstract

Evidence of severe hepatobiliary morbidity associated with Opisthorchis viverrini liver fluke infection including cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is scarce in Laos although O. viverrini infection is highly prevalent. We assessed hepatobiliary morbidity using abdominal ultrasonography (US) in O. viverrini adult patients in Saravan province, Southern Laos. A random sample of 431 O. viverrini patients from 10 villages underwent abdominal US. Mild, moderate and markedly advanced periductal fibrosis was diagnosed in 7.0%, 66.5%, and 17.0% of patients, respectively. Normal liver parenchyma was seen in only 9.5% of patients. Presence of gall stones (13.2%), sludge (1.4%), gall wall thickening (1.2%), bile duct dilatation (1.6%), fatty liver (12.0%), kidney stones (8.6%) and cysts (7.9%) were diagnosed in considerable frequencies. In five patients (1.2%) hepatobiliary lesions suggesting CCA were diagnosed. Tumour markers, i.e. Interleukin-6, plasminogen activator inhibitor and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 were within normal range. The number of CCA suspected liver masses and hepatobiliary morbidity diagnosed among clinically asymptomatic adult patients in O. viverrini endemic area presents a major public health concern in Laos. However, definitive diagnosis of Opisthorchis-related severe sequelae including CCA is urgently needed to gauge the burden of this deadly disease in Laos.

Abstract

Evidence of severe hepatobiliary morbidity associated with Opisthorchis viverrini liver fluke infection including cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is scarce in Laos although O. viverrini infection is highly prevalent. We assessed hepatobiliary morbidity using abdominal ultrasonography (US) in O. viverrini adult patients in Saravan province, Southern Laos. A random sample of 431 O. viverrini patients from 10 villages underwent abdominal US. Mild, moderate and markedly advanced periductal fibrosis was diagnosed in 7.0%, 66.5%, and 17.0% of patients, respectively. Normal liver parenchyma was seen in only 9.5% of patients. Presence of gall stones (13.2%), sludge (1.4%), gall wall thickening (1.2%), bile duct dilatation (1.6%), fatty liver (12.0%), kidney stones (8.6%) and cysts (7.9%) were diagnosed in considerable frequencies. In five patients (1.2%) hepatobiliary lesions suggesting CCA were diagnosed. Tumour markers, i.e. Interleukin-6, plasminogen activator inhibitor and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 were within normal range. The number of CCA suspected liver masses and hepatobiliary morbidity diagnosed among clinically asymptomatic adult patients in O. viverrini endemic area presents a major public health concern in Laos. However, definitive diagnosis of Opisthorchis-related severe sequelae including CCA is urgently needed to gauge the burden of this deadly disease in Laos.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2015
Deposited On:26 Feb 2015 07:15
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:52
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0001-706X
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.actatropica.2014.09.014
PubMed ID:25275346

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