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Respiratory dysfunction in patients with chronic neck pain - influence of thoracic spine and chest mobility


Wirth, B; Amstalden, M; Perk, M; Boutellier, U; Humphreys, B K (2014). Respiratory dysfunction in patients with chronic neck pain - influence of thoracic spine and chest mobility. Manual Therapy, 19(5):440-444.

Abstract

Patients with chronic neck pain exhibit various musculoskeletal deficits and respiratory dysfunction. As there is a link between thoracic and cervical spine motion, the aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between thoracic spine and chest mobility with respiratory function and neck disability. Nineteen patients with chronic neck pain (7 male, 46.6 ± 10.5 years) and 19 healthy subjects (7 male, 46.5 ± 9.9 years) participated. Spirometry was conducted to determine maximal voluntary ventilation (MVV), maximal inspiratory (Pimax) and maximal expiratory pressure (Pemax). Thoracic spine mobility was measured using the Spinal Mouse(®). Chest expansion was assessed by subtracting chest circumference during maximal inspiration and expiration. Neck function was investigated by examining range of motion, forward head posture, neck flexor muscle synergy endurance and self-assessment (Neck disability index (NDI)). Correlation analyses and multiple linear regression analyses were conducted using MVV, Pimax and Pemax as independent variables. Thoracic spine mobility during flexion and chest expansion correlated significantly to MVV (r = 0.45 and 0.42), all neck motions (r between 0.39 and 0.59) and neck muscle endurance (rS = 0.36). Pemax and Pimax were related to NDI (r = -0.58 and -0.46). In the regression models, chest expansion was the only significant predictor for MVV, and Pemax was determined by neck muscle endurance. These results suggest that chronic neck pain patients should improve the endurance of the neck flexor muscles and thoracic spine and chest mobility. Additionally, these patients might benefit from respiratory muscle endurance training, possibly by increasing chest mobility and Pemax.

Abstract

Patients with chronic neck pain exhibit various musculoskeletal deficits and respiratory dysfunction. As there is a link between thoracic and cervical spine motion, the aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between thoracic spine and chest mobility with respiratory function and neck disability. Nineteen patients with chronic neck pain (7 male, 46.6 ± 10.5 years) and 19 healthy subjects (7 male, 46.5 ± 9.9 years) participated. Spirometry was conducted to determine maximal voluntary ventilation (MVV), maximal inspiratory (Pimax) and maximal expiratory pressure (Pemax). Thoracic spine mobility was measured using the Spinal Mouse(®). Chest expansion was assessed by subtracting chest circumference during maximal inspiration and expiration. Neck function was investigated by examining range of motion, forward head posture, neck flexor muscle synergy endurance and self-assessment (Neck disability index (NDI)). Correlation analyses and multiple linear regression analyses were conducted using MVV, Pimax and Pemax as independent variables. Thoracic spine mobility during flexion and chest expansion correlated significantly to MVV (r = 0.45 and 0.42), all neck motions (r between 0.39 and 0.59) and neck muscle endurance (rS = 0.36). Pemax and Pimax were related to NDI (r = -0.58 and -0.46). In the regression models, chest expansion was the only significant predictor for MVV, and Pemax was determined by neck muscle endurance. These results suggest that chronic neck pain patients should improve the endurance of the neck flexor muscles and thoracic spine and chest mobility. Additionally, these patients might benefit from respiratory muscle endurance training, possibly by increasing chest mobility and Pemax.

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7 citations in Web of Science®
11 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:October 2014
Deposited On:18 Feb 2015 15:30
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:53
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1356-689X
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.math.2014.04.011
PubMed ID:24835338

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