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Malaria chemoprophylaxis regimens: A descriptive drug utilization study


Bloechliger, Marlene; Schlagenhauf, Patricia; Toovey, Stephen; Schnetzler, Gabriel; Tatt, Iain; Tomianovic, Danitza; Jick, Susan S; Meier, Christoph R (2014). Malaria chemoprophylaxis regimens: A descriptive drug utilization study. Travel Medicine and Infectious Disease, 12(6B):718-725.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Mefloquine belongs to the priority chemoprophylaxis drugs for travelers to malaria endemic regions. We aimed to assess the prescribing patterns for mefloquine and other antimalarials.
METHODS: We conducted a descriptive drug utilization study using the U.K. Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD). We assessed characteristics of individuals with a first-time antimalarial prescription for mefloquine, atovaquone/proguanil, chloroquine and/or proguanil, or doxycycline between 2001 and 2012.
RESULTS: Of 165,218 individuals with a first-time antimalarial prescription, 108,344 (65.6%), 25,294 (15.3%), 23,195 (14.0%), and 8385 (5.1%) were prescribed atovaquone/proguanil, mefloquine, doxycycline, and chloroquine and/or proguanil, respectively. Among mefloquine users, 7.5% had a history of a neuropsychiatric disorder (versus 12.6%-13.7% among other antimalarial users) and 0.04% had a history of severe liver disease (versus 0.04%-0.1% among other antimalarial users). A total of 19.4% mefloquine users were children younger than 12 years (versus 0.4%-15.8% among other antimalarials), and 1.3% pregnant or postpartum women (versus 0.4%-1.4% among users of other antimalarials).
CONCLUSIONS: The most frequently prescribed antimalarial chemoprophylaxis was atovaquone/proguanil. Mefloquine was occasionally prescribed for patients with comorbidities listed as contraindications, but most practitioners observed contraindications. Mefloquine was often prescribed for children and pregnant women.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Mefloquine belongs to the priority chemoprophylaxis drugs for travelers to malaria endemic regions. We aimed to assess the prescribing patterns for mefloquine and other antimalarials.
METHODS: We conducted a descriptive drug utilization study using the U.K. Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD). We assessed characteristics of individuals with a first-time antimalarial prescription for mefloquine, atovaquone/proguanil, chloroquine and/or proguanil, or doxycycline between 2001 and 2012.
RESULTS: Of 165,218 individuals with a first-time antimalarial prescription, 108,344 (65.6%), 25,294 (15.3%), 23,195 (14.0%), and 8385 (5.1%) were prescribed atovaquone/proguanil, mefloquine, doxycycline, and chloroquine and/or proguanil, respectively. Among mefloquine users, 7.5% had a history of a neuropsychiatric disorder (versus 12.6%-13.7% among other antimalarial users) and 0.04% had a history of severe liver disease (versus 0.04%-0.1% among other antimalarial users). A total of 19.4% mefloquine users were children younger than 12 years (versus 0.4%-15.8% among other antimalarials), and 1.3% pregnant or postpartum women (versus 0.4%-1.4% among users of other antimalarials).
CONCLUSIONS: The most frequently prescribed antimalarial chemoprophylaxis was atovaquone/proguanil. Mefloquine was occasionally prescribed for patients with comorbidities listed as contraindications, but most practitioners observed contraindications. Mefloquine was often prescribed for children and pregnant women.

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6 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:13 Feb 2015 11:46
Last Modified:08 Dec 2017 10:55
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1477-8939
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tmaid.2014.05.006
PubMed ID:24934849

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