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Childhood vaccination associated adverse events by sex: A literature review


Köhli Weber, Sandra; Schlagenhauf, Patricia (2014). Childhood vaccination associated adverse events by sex: A literature review. Travel Medicine and Infectious Disease, 12(5):459-480.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Most approved medicines, including vaccines can be associated with adverse events. A vaccine adverse event is defined as any untoward medical occurrence which follows vaccination, but which does not necessarily have a causal relationship with the administration of the vaccine.
METHODS: The objective of this structured literature review is to analyse the adverse events reported with vaccinations usually done during childhood and adolescence: human papilloma virus vaccine, hepatitis B vaccine and measles-mumps-rubella vaccine. We evaluated the vaccine literature on children and adolescents by sex. We searched the Cochrane Database, Medline (Pubmed) and Embase using predefined terms.
RESULTS: Of the 417 publications retrieved from searches in the 3 databases, 89 papers (21%) were identified as potentially relevant to the review. On further scrutiny 41 of these satisfied the criteria for inclusion in the analysis. Serious adverse events related to vaccinations were rare. We found some possible sex related vaccine adverse events. Few trials however reported adverse events by age and sex and very few analyses evaluated the observed differences.
CONCLUSIONS: Despite earlier calls for sex-specific analyses of clinical studies, we found that vaccine trials were rarely reported and published by sex. Prospectively collated vaccine safety data in children and adolescents should be analysed by age and sex, so that clinical trial results can form an evidence base for vaccine practice recommendations.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Most approved medicines, including vaccines can be associated with adverse events. A vaccine adverse event is defined as any untoward medical occurrence which follows vaccination, but which does not necessarily have a causal relationship with the administration of the vaccine.
METHODS: The objective of this structured literature review is to analyse the adverse events reported with vaccinations usually done during childhood and adolescence: human papilloma virus vaccine, hepatitis B vaccine and measles-mumps-rubella vaccine. We evaluated the vaccine literature on children and adolescents by sex. We searched the Cochrane Database, Medline (Pubmed) and Embase using predefined terms.
RESULTS: Of the 417 publications retrieved from searches in the 3 databases, 89 papers (21%) were identified as potentially relevant to the review. On further scrutiny 41 of these satisfied the criteria for inclusion in the analysis. Serious adverse events related to vaccinations were rare. We found some possible sex related vaccine adverse events. Few trials however reported adverse events by age and sex and very few analyses evaluated the observed differences.
CONCLUSIONS: Despite earlier calls for sex-specific analyses of clinical studies, we found that vaccine trials were rarely reported and published by sex. Prospectively collated vaccine safety data in children and adolescents should be analysed by age and sex, so that clinical trial results can form an evidence base for vaccine practice recommendations.

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5 citations in Web of Science®
4 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:13 Feb 2015 11:47
Last Modified:08 Dec 2017 10:56
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1477-8939
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tmaid.2014.01.008
PubMed ID:24680600

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