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Tacrolimus depresses local immune cell infiltration but fails to reduce cortical contusion volume in brain-injured rats


Thomale, U W; Bender, M; Casalis, P; Rupprecht, S; Griebenow, M; Neumann, K; Woiciechowsky, C; Unterberg, A W; Stover, J F (2007). Tacrolimus depresses local immune cell infiltration but fails to reduce cortical contusion volume in brain-injured rats. Immunobiology, 212(7):567-576.

Abstract

The immunosuppressant drug tacrolimus (FK-506) failed to show an anti-edematous effect despite suppressing pro-inflammatory cytokines in cerebrospinal fluid following focal traumatic brain injury. By questioning the role of the inflammatory response as a pharmacological target, we investigated the effects of FK-506 on immune cell infiltration in brain-injured rats. Following induction of a cortical contusion, male Sprague-Dawley rats received FK-506 or physiological saline intraperitoneally. Brains were removed at 24 h, 72 h or 7 days, respectively. Frozen brain sections (7 microm) were stained immunohistologically for markers of endothelial activation (intercellular adhesion molecule-1--ICAM-1), neutrophil infiltration (His-48), and microglial and macrophage activation (Ox-6; ED-1), respectively. Immunopositive cells were counted microscopically. Contusion volume (CV) was quantified morphometrically 7 days after trauma. Inflammatory response was confined to the ipsilateral cortex and hippocampal formation, predominating in the contusion and pericontusional cortex. Strongest ICAM-1 expression coincided with sustained granulocyte accumulation at 72h which was suppressed by FK-506. Ox-6+ cells prevailing at 72 h were also significantly reduced by FK-506. ED-1+ cells reaching highest intensity at 7 days were significantly attenuated at 72 h. Cortical CV was not influenced. FK-506 significantly decreased post-traumatic local inflammation which, however, was not associated with a reduction in cortical CV. These results question the importance of post-traumatic local immune cell infiltration in the secondary growth of a cortical contusion.

Abstract

The immunosuppressant drug tacrolimus (FK-506) failed to show an anti-edematous effect despite suppressing pro-inflammatory cytokines in cerebrospinal fluid following focal traumatic brain injury. By questioning the role of the inflammatory response as a pharmacological target, we investigated the effects of FK-506 on immune cell infiltration in brain-injured rats. Following induction of a cortical contusion, male Sprague-Dawley rats received FK-506 or physiological saline intraperitoneally. Brains were removed at 24 h, 72 h or 7 days, respectively. Frozen brain sections (7 microm) were stained immunohistologically for markers of endothelial activation (intercellular adhesion molecule-1--ICAM-1), neutrophil infiltration (His-48), and microglial and macrophage activation (Ox-6; ED-1), respectively. Immunopositive cells were counted microscopically. Contusion volume (CV) was quantified morphometrically 7 days after trauma. Inflammatory response was confined to the ipsilateral cortex and hippocampal formation, predominating in the contusion and pericontusional cortex. Strongest ICAM-1 expression coincided with sustained granulocyte accumulation at 72h which was suppressed by FK-506. Ox-6+ cells prevailing at 72 h were also significantly reduced by FK-506. ED-1+ cells reaching highest intensity at 7 days were significantly attenuated at 72 h. Cortical CV was not influenced. FK-506 significantly decreased post-traumatic local inflammation which, however, was not associated with a reduction in cortical CV. These results question the importance of post-traumatic local immune cell infiltration in the secondary growth of a cortical contusion.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Division of Surgical Intensive Care Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2007
Deposited On:18 Mar 2009 14:30
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:50
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0171-2985
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.imbio.2007.01.007
PubMed ID:17678714

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