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Universal self-assembly of organosilanes with long alkyl groups into silicone nanofilaments


Zhang, Junping; Wang, Aiqin; Seeger, Stefan (2014). Universal self-assembly of organosilanes with long alkyl groups into silicone nanofilaments. Polymer Chemistry, 5(4):1132-1139.

Abstract

Recently, a new group of nanostructures called "silicone nanofilaments (SNs)" were prepared via polymerization of organosilanes with small alkyl groups. Organosilanes with long alkyl groups tend to form self-assembled monolayers and cannot form SNs because. of their bulky steric hindrance. Here we report the one-step self-assembly of organosilanes with long alkyl groups into SN coatings at room temperature by using tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) or tetrachlorosilane (TCS) as the molecular spacer. The SNs should grow according to a "limiting growth" mechanism via a "seeding-asymmetric growth-further growth" process. The growth of SNs could be controlled simply by the composition of the precursor and the water concentration (C-water) in toluene. All the precursors studied can form SNs successfully under proper conditions, indicating universality of this method. The wettability of the SN coatings ranges from hydrophilic to superhydrophobic and even to superamphiphobic. Moreover, these coatings are transparent and can be easily applied onto various substrates besides the glass slide. This facile fabrication of SNs using organosilanes with tong alkyl groups will shed light on their application in generating unique nanostructures besides self-assembled monolayers.

Abstract

Recently, a new group of nanostructures called "silicone nanofilaments (SNs)" were prepared via polymerization of organosilanes with small alkyl groups. Organosilanes with long alkyl groups tend to form self-assembled monolayers and cannot form SNs because. of their bulky steric hindrance. Here we report the one-step self-assembly of organosilanes with long alkyl groups into SN coatings at room temperature by using tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) or tetrachlorosilane (TCS) as the molecular spacer. The SNs should grow according to a "limiting growth" mechanism via a "seeding-asymmetric growth-further growth" process. The growth of SNs could be controlled simply by the composition of the precursor and the water concentration (C-water) in toluene. All the precursors studied can form SNs successfully under proper conditions, indicating universality of this method. The wettability of the SN coatings ranges from hydrophilic to superhydrophobic and even to superamphiphobic. Moreover, these coatings are transparent and can be easily applied onto various substrates besides the glass slide. This facile fabrication of SNs using organosilanes with tong alkyl groups will shed light on their application in generating unique nanostructures besides self-assembled monolayers.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Department of Chemistry
Dewey Decimal Classification:540 Chemistry
Language:English
Date:21 February 2014
Deposited On:19 Feb 2015 14:12
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:54
Publisher:R S C Publications
ISSN:1759-9954
Funders:"Hundred Talents Program" of the Chinese Academy of Sciences
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1039/c3py01293j

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