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Therapeutic hypothermia reduces middle cerebral artery flow velocity in patients with severe aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage


Seule, M; Muroi, C; Sikorski, C; Hugelshofer, M; Winkler, K; Keller, E (2014). Therapeutic hypothermia reduces middle cerebral artery flow velocity in patients with severe aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Neurocritical Care, 20(2):255-262.

Abstract

Background: Transcranial Doppler (TCD) is widely used to detect and follow up cerebral vasospasm after sub- arachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Therapeutic hypothermia might influence blood flow velocities assessed by TCD. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of hypo- thermia on Doppler blood flow velocity after SAH.
Methods: In 20 patients treated with hypothermia (33°) due to refractory intracranial hypertension or delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI), mean flow velocity of the middle cerebral artery (MFVMCA) was assessed by TCD. Thirteen patients were treated with combined hypothermia and barbiturate coma and seven with hypothermia alone. MFVMCA was obtained within 24 h before and after induction of hypothermia as well as before and after rewarming.
Results: Hypothermia was induced on average 5 days after SAH (range 1–12) and maintained for 144 h (range 29–270). After hypothermia induction, MFVMCA decreased from 113.7 ± 49.0 to 93.8 ± 44.7 cm/s (p = 0.001). The decrease was independent of SAH-related complications and barbiturate coma. MFVMCA further decreased by 28.2 cm/s between early and late hypothermia (p < 0.001). This second decrease was observed in patients with DCI (p < 0.001), but not in patients with intracranial hypertension (p = 0.715). Compared to late hypothermia, MFVMCA remained unchanged after rewarming (65.6 ± 32.1 vs 70.3 ± 36.8 cm/s; p = 0.219). However, patients treated with hypothermia alone showed an increase in MFVMCA after rewarming (p = 0.016).
Conclusion: Therapeutic hypothermia after SAH decrea- ses Doppler blood flow velocity in both intracranial hypertension and DCI cases. The results can be the effect of hypothermia-related mechanisms or resolving cerebral vasospasm during prolonged hypothermia.

Abstract

Background: Transcranial Doppler (TCD) is widely used to detect and follow up cerebral vasospasm after sub- arachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Therapeutic hypothermia might influence blood flow velocities assessed by TCD. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of hypo- thermia on Doppler blood flow velocity after SAH.
Methods: In 20 patients treated with hypothermia (33°) due to refractory intracranial hypertension or delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI), mean flow velocity of the middle cerebral artery (MFVMCA) was assessed by TCD. Thirteen patients were treated with combined hypothermia and barbiturate coma and seven with hypothermia alone. MFVMCA was obtained within 24 h before and after induction of hypothermia as well as before and after rewarming.
Results: Hypothermia was induced on average 5 days after SAH (range 1–12) and maintained for 144 h (range 29–270). After hypothermia induction, MFVMCA decreased from 113.7 ± 49.0 to 93.8 ± 44.7 cm/s (p = 0.001). The decrease was independent of SAH-related complications and barbiturate coma. MFVMCA further decreased by 28.2 cm/s between early and late hypothermia (p < 0.001). This second decrease was observed in patients with DCI (p < 0.001), but not in patients with intracranial hypertension (p = 0.715). Compared to late hypothermia, MFVMCA remained unchanged after rewarming (65.6 ± 32.1 vs 70.3 ± 36.8 cm/s; p = 0.219). However, patients treated with hypothermia alone showed an increase in MFVMCA after rewarming (p = 0.016).
Conclusion: Therapeutic hypothermia after SAH decrea- ses Doppler blood flow velocity in both intracranial hypertension and DCI cases. The results can be the effect of hypothermia-related mechanisms or resolving cerebral vasospasm during prolonged hypothermia.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurosurgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:April 2014
Deposited On:06 Feb 2015 14:01
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:54
Publisher:Humana Press (Springer)
ISSN:1541-6933
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s12028-013-9927-x
PubMed ID:24132567

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