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Differential concentration-dependent effects of prolonged norepinephrine infusion on intraparenchymal hemorrhage and cortical contusion in brain-injured rats


Van Landeghem, F K H; Schreiber, S; Unterberg, A W; Von Deimling, A; Stover, J F (2003). Differential concentration-dependent effects of prolonged norepinephrine infusion on intraparenchymal hemorrhage and cortical contusion in brain-injured rats. Journal of Neurotrauma, 20(12):1327-1337.

Abstract

Under clinical conditions catecholamines are infused to elevate cerebral perfusion pressure and improve impaired posttraumatic cerebral microcirculation. This, however, is associated with the risk of additional hemorrhage in the acute phase following traumatic brain injury. In the present study we investigated the dose-dependent effects of prolonged norepinephrine infusion on arterial blood pressure, blood glucose, and structural damage in brain-injured rats. At 4 h following induction of a focal cortical contusion (CCI), 40 rats were randomized to receive low (0.15), medium (0.3), or high dose (1 microg/kg/min) norepinephrine. Control rats were given equal volume of NaCl. Norepinephrine and NaCl were infused intravenously via Alzet osmotic pumps for 44 h. Mean arterial blood pressure (MABP), blood gases and blood glucose were determined before, at 4, 24, 48 h after CCI in repeatedly anesthetized rats (n = 28). Systolic arterial blood pressure (SABP) was measured using the tail cuff method in awake, restrained rats (n = 12). Cortical contusion and intraparenchymal hemorrhage volume were quantified at 48 h in all rats. MABP determined in anesthetized rats was only marginally increased. SABP was significantly elevated during infusion of medium and high dose norepinephrine in awake rats, exceeding 140 mm Hg. Medium and high dose norepinephrine significantly increased cortical hemorrhage by 157% and 142%, without increasing the cortical contusion volume. Low dose norepinephrine significantly reduced the cortical contusion by 44%. Norepinephrine aggravates the underlying brain damage during the acute posttraumatic phase. Future studies are needed to determine the least deleterious norepinephrine concentration.

Abstract

Under clinical conditions catecholamines are infused to elevate cerebral perfusion pressure and improve impaired posttraumatic cerebral microcirculation. This, however, is associated with the risk of additional hemorrhage in the acute phase following traumatic brain injury. In the present study we investigated the dose-dependent effects of prolonged norepinephrine infusion on arterial blood pressure, blood glucose, and structural damage in brain-injured rats. At 4 h following induction of a focal cortical contusion (CCI), 40 rats were randomized to receive low (0.15), medium (0.3), or high dose (1 microg/kg/min) norepinephrine. Control rats were given equal volume of NaCl. Norepinephrine and NaCl were infused intravenously via Alzet osmotic pumps for 44 h. Mean arterial blood pressure (MABP), blood gases and blood glucose were determined before, at 4, 24, 48 h after CCI in repeatedly anesthetized rats (n = 28). Systolic arterial blood pressure (SABP) was measured using the tail cuff method in awake, restrained rats (n = 12). Cortical contusion and intraparenchymal hemorrhage volume were quantified at 48 h in all rats. MABP determined in anesthetized rats was only marginally increased. SABP was significantly elevated during infusion of medium and high dose norepinephrine in awake rats, exceeding 140 mm Hg. Medium and high dose norepinephrine significantly increased cortical hemorrhage by 157% and 142%, without increasing the cortical contusion volume. Low dose norepinephrine significantly reduced the cortical contusion by 44%. Norepinephrine aggravates the underlying brain damage during the acute posttraumatic phase. Future studies are needed to determine the least deleterious norepinephrine concentration.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Division of Surgical Intensive Care Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2003
Deposited On:25 Sep 2009 13:39
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:51
Publisher:Mary Ann Liebert
ISSN:0897-7151
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1089/089771503322686120
PubMed ID:14748981

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