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Association of intraoperative transfusion of blood products with mortality in lung transplant recipients


Weber, Denise; Cottini, Silvia R; Locher, Pascal; Wenger, Urs; Stehberger, Paul A; Fasshauer, Mario; Schuepbach, Reto A; Béchir, Markus (2013). Association of intraoperative transfusion of blood products with mortality in lung transplant recipients. Perioperative Medicine, 2:20.

Abstract

BACKGROUND The impact of intraoperative transfusion on postoperative mortality in lung transplant recipients is still elusive. METHODS Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed to investigate the influence of red blood cells (RBCs) and fresh frozen plasma (FFP) on mortality in 134 consecutive lung transplants recipients from September 2003 until December 2008. RESULTS Intraoperative transfusion of RBCs and FFP was associated with a significant increase in mortality with odds ratios (ORs) of 1.10 (1.03 to 1.16, P = 0.02) and 1.09 (1.02 to 1.15, P = 0.03), respectively. For more than four intraoperatively transfused RBCs multivariate analysis showed a hazard ratio for mortality of 3.8 (1.40 to 10.31, P = 0.003). Furthermore, non-survivors showed a significant increase in renal replacement therapy (RRT) (36.6% versus 6.9%, P <0.0001), primary graft dysfunction (PGD) (39.3% versus 5.9%, P <0.0001), postoperative need of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) (26.9% versus 3.1%, P = 0.0019), sepsis (24.2% versus 4.0%, P = 0.0004), multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) (26.9% versus 3.1%, P <0.0001), infections (18.1% versus 0.9%, P = 0.0004), retransplantation (12.1% versus 6.9%, P = 0.039) and readmission to the ICU (33.3% versus 12.8%, P = 0.024). CONCLUSIONS Intraoperative transfusion is associated with a strong negative influence on outcome in lung transplant recipients.

Abstract

BACKGROUND The impact of intraoperative transfusion on postoperative mortality in lung transplant recipients is still elusive. METHODS Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed to investigate the influence of red blood cells (RBCs) and fresh frozen plasma (FFP) on mortality in 134 consecutive lung transplants recipients from September 2003 until December 2008. RESULTS Intraoperative transfusion of RBCs and FFP was associated with a significant increase in mortality with odds ratios (ORs) of 1.10 (1.03 to 1.16, P = 0.02) and 1.09 (1.02 to 1.15, P = 0.03), respectively. For more than four intraoperatively transfused RBCs multivariate analysis showed a hazard ratio for mortality of 3.8 (1.40 to 10.31, P = 0.003). Furthermore, non-survivors showed a significant increase in renal replacement therapy (RRT) (36.6% versus 6.9%, P <0.0001), primary graft dysfunction (PGD) (39.3% versus 5.9%, P <0.0001), postoperative need of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) (26.9% versus 3.1%, P = 0.0019), sepsis (24.2% versus 4.0%, P = 0.0004), multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) (26.9% versus 3.1%, P <0.0001), infections (18.1% versus 0.9%, P = 0.0004), retransplantation (12.1% versus 6.9%, P = 0.039) and readmission to the ICU (33.3% versus 12.8%, P = 0.024). CONCLUSIONS Intraoperative transfusion is associated with a strong negative influence on outcome in lung transplant recipients.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Intensive Care Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:05 Feb 2015 14:14
Last Modified:16 Feb 2018 20:03
Publisher:BioMed Central
ISSN:2047-0525
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1186/2047-0525-2-20
PubMed ID:24472535

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