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Cost of illness for bipolar disorder: a systematic review of the economic burden


Kleine-Budde, Katja; Touil, Elina; Moock, Jörn; Bramesfeld, Anke; Kawohl, Wolfram; Rössler, Wulf (2014). Cost of illness for bipolar disorder: a systematic review of the economic burden. Bipolar disorders, 16(4):337-353.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Recent reviews lack important information on the high cost-of-illness worldwide for bipolar disorder (BD). Therefore, the present study systematically analyzed those costs, their driving components, and the methodological quality with which the few existing cost-of-illness investigations have been performed.
METHODS: In June 2012, we conducted a systematic literature review of electronic databases to identify relevant cost-of-illness studies published since 2000. Their methodological quality was assessed. Costs were standardized by first extrapolating them to 2009 using country-specific gross domestic product inflators and then converting them into US dollars via purchasing power parities (PPP).
RESULTS: The main characteristics of 22 studies were evaluated. Ignoring outliers, costs per capita ranged from 8,000 to 14,000 USD-PPP for overall direct healthcare, from 4,000 to 5,000 USD-PPP for direct mental healthcare, and from 2,500 to 5,000 USD-PPP for direct BD-related care. Indirect costs ranged from 2,000 to 11,000 USD-PPP. Inpatient care was the main cost driver in three studies; drug costs, in two studies. Methodological quality was deemed satisfactory.
CONCLUSIONS: The cost variance was great between studies. This was likely due to differences in methodology rather than healthcare systems, thereby making such comparisons difficult. The results showed that BD has a substantial economic burden on society. To gain more evidence, international standardized checklists are needed when undertaking cost-of-illness studies.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Recent reviews lack important information on the high cost-of-illness worldwide for bipolar disorder (BD). Therefore, the present study systematically analyzed those costs, their driving components, and the methodological quality with which the few existing cost-of-illness investigations have been performed.
METHODS: In June 2012, we conducted a systematic literature review of electronic databases to identify relevant cost-of-illness studies published since 2000. Their methodological quality was assessed. Costs were standardized by first extrapolating them to 2009 using country-specific gross domestic product inflators and then converting them into US dollars via purchasing power parities (PPP).
RESULTS: The main characteristics of 22 studies were evaluated. Ignoring outliers, costs per capita ranged from 8,000 to 14,000 USD-PPP for overall direct healthcare, from 4,000 to 5,000 USD-PPP for direct mental healthcare, and from 2,500 to 5,000 USD-PPP for direct BD-related care. Indirect costs ranged from 2,000 to 11,000 USD-PPP. Inpatient care was the main cost driver in three studies; drug costs, in two studies. Methodological quality was deemed satisfactory.
CONCLUSIONS: The cost variance was great between studies. This was likely due to differences in methodology rather than healthcare systems, thereby making such comparisons difficult. The results showed that BD has a substantial economic burden on society. To gain more evidence, international standardized checklists are needed when undertaking cost-of-illness studies.

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25 citations in Web of Science®
26 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Psychiatry, Psychotherapy, and Psychosomatics
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:04 Mar 2015 15:31
Last Modified:08 Dec 2017 11:07
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:1398-5647
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/bdi.12165
PubMed ID:24372893

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